Religion Book Reviews (page 174)

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Occasionally preachy (especially about why Reagan was the perfect symbol of the shallow spirituality of the '80s), but always subtly perceptive, this is essential reading for anyone wishing to understand noninstitutional religion in America."
A stirring, eloquent commentary on contemporary Americans— spiritual condition. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Despite the occasional spark of connection, this epigonous work, so admittedly indebted to Scholem, adds little to what can be found more eloquently expressed in the master's Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism."
This new book by Silberman (The Hidden Scrolls, 1994) founders on the distinction it fails to keep between history and myth, description and celebration. Read full book review >

KADDISH by Leon  Wieseltier
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 24, 1998

"A fascinating excursion into Jewish law and history, and into questions of one's responsibility to one's parents, to the past, and to the future."
A fervent and illuminating philosophical journel from the literary editor of the New Republic. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 15, 1998

"A well-researched study that neither allocates blame nor exonerates the participants in the peculiar institution, but puts to rest a pernicious anti-Semitic libel of recent coinage."
Despite the polemical subtitle, a scholarly and meticulously researched account of Jewish participation in the slave trade in the British colonies of the Caribbean and in the US. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 11, 1998

"An admirable debut by Suberman, vividly told and captivating in its humanity. (Author tour)"
In this first book by a retired book reviewer for the Miami Herald, Suberman recounts the story of her family's sojourn as the only Jews in a rural Tennessee town in the 1920s. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 2, 1998

"Literary interpretations of the Bible are always welcome; but the Bible as literature is too complex comfortably to sport the evolutionary straitjacket Easterbrook has prepared for it."
Easterbrook (A Moment on the Earth, 1995), a journalist, believes that the biblical God, interpreted as a deity in progress, provides sophisticated secularists with a reason to read the Bible—but his own highly selective and simplifying reading of that ancient text will engage few who know it more than passingly. Read full book review >
SCARLET RIBBONS by Rosemary Bailey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"The ambiguities in Simon's life that the author preserves in her memorial of him will deepen and extend the impression he leaves. (16 b&w photos)"
Successfully integrating her voices of loving sister and dispassionate reporter, the author, a journalist, tells the life story of her brother, Simon Bailey, a gay priest in the Church of England who died in 1995 of AIDS. Read full book review >
SEARCHING FOR RED EAGLE by Mary Ann Wells
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Wells seems too smitten with her own reflections on this strangely tragic career to impart any meaningful larger lessons."
A book that begins as a straightforward biography of a little-known figure in Native American history devolves, alas, into a self-satisfied New Age treatise. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Yet Lynch has missed the mark he set for himself: tying Sheen's popularity to larger cultural trends. (5 b&w photos, not seen)"
A thin, unsatisfactory examination of Bishop Fulton Sheen's rise to television prominence in the 1950s. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 17, 1998

"This is valuable for its short biographical sketches, but its disunity leaves the reader wishing for more intellectual meat. (b&w photos, not seen)"
An ambitious but disjointed exploration of social justice in the Catholic Church. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 14, 1998

Another addition to the recent spate of books on the new (old) German capital. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 10, 1998

A disjointed but provocative account of a spiritual journey. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >