Religion Book Reviews (page 174)

HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1996

"Worthwhile if you haven't journeyed with Raphael before."
Raphael's ``greatest hits'': This collection of 13 essays offers remixes and reprises of some of his better-known material. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1996

"In the end, this narrative is at once too private and too impersonal—the reader floats on the surface of events and characters, unable to to enter into the Salamons' search for a safe place to raise their family. (photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
Bonfire of the Vanities film chronicler Salamon (The Devil's Candy, 1991) leaves Hollywood for sadder and more personal venues as she searches, none too successfully, to understand her family's history. Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1996

"The author's polemical tone throughout must raise doubts about the reliability of his work. (Author tour)"
Carefully researched but basically slanted story of one year in the life of a ``typical'' American Catholic parish. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1996

A sometimes murky, frequently meandering excursion into the meaning of ancient Andean beliefs, arguing that in a series of sophisticated myths Incan soothsayers foretold their own civilization's doom at the hands of Pizarro and his conquistadors in 1532. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 1, 1996

"Walsh dramatically highlights tensions between Catholic dogma and Hollywood glitter, but greater insight into the Church would have given this study more weight. (32 b&w photos, not seen)"
A humorous but critical portrayal of the Catholic Church's censorship of Hollywood movies from WW I to the present. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1996

"In sum, one can read this in lieu of spending an evening with a well-meaning but long-winded relative or use it, sparingly, as a resouce for insight into traditional Native American practices."
The life and healing practices of a Muskogee Creek medicine man who seems never to have met a disease he couldn't cure. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1996

"Given its limitations, the book will chiefly be of interest to students of medieval Jewish history. (History Book Club selection)"
A plodding study of the background, dynamics, and historical treatments of the Rhineland massacre of Jews in the First Crusade. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1996

"With this anthology topping out at 560 pages, Rosenberg could have been more discriminating in his selections and their presentation."
A generally strained anthology, with several memorable individual essays. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Feb. 14, 1996

"One hopes that other historians will follow McDannell's bold lead and attend to this neglected aspect of religious expression. (100 b&w photos and 24 color plates, not seen)"
A groundbreaking, impressively researched, and kitsch-filled exploration of how Americans' sacred ``stuff'' both shapes and reflects their religious beliefs. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Feb. 5, 1996

"This collection of identity conflicts seems to be struggling for its own identity."
A narrow examination of the conflicting concepts of identity shared by the masses of marginal Jews. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"It does, however, convey with remarkable immediacy one man's wartime anguish and is valuable for what it reveals about human nature during times of extreme duress. (map and 9 photos, not seen)"
The story of a Polish Jew who faced moral as well as emotional anguish in the Holocaust, told in his own tortured words. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"This essential collection captures the best of a leading thinker and doer who influenced many contemporaries with an ancient prophetic tradition that he made new."
Collected essays by Rabbi Heschel (190772), one of our century's most eloquent and challenging theologians. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >