Religion Book Reviews (page 174)

RELIGION
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"It is the account of a group of people determined to make a difference—and of those who made a difference to them."
A poignant, heartfelt account of caring for children dying of AIDS. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 9, 1994

"Vivid, lighthearted, and unself-consciously profound."
An affectionate glimpse at the worlds of Japan and Zen. Read full book review >

HARD TRAVEL TO SACRED PLACES by Rudolph Wurlitzer
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 5, 1994

"Go elsewhere for all four."
A Southeast Asia travelogue that looks for spiritual sustenance but instead finds distraction in spiritual tourism and lengthy quotation. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"A rewarding anthology by women who take the Bible seriously and on its own terms, as a literary, ethical, and spiritual expression."
A group of really smart women give astute readings of the Bible that, for the most part, subscribe to neither religious nor feminist orthodoxies. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"This is an object lesson in what can happen when a versatile scholar draws on the tools of critical theory too much and reflects on the actual texts—and their authors' premodern contexts—too little."
A ``distant'' (as opposed to ``close'') reading of the Hebrew Bible via a largely unfocused use of gender and other modern and postmodern analytical categories. Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

A strange work of travel writing that might well have been entitled International Investment and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"A lovingly wrought—but overly lengthy—bit of arcane religious history. (b&w illustrations)"
A scrupulous dissection of the daily lives of a group of cloistered 17th-century Franciscan nuns as seen through the eyes of one blighted sister in their midst. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: July 29, 1994

"Compelling and well presented, this volume deserves to be read by anyone concerned with Christian or political extremism in America."
A fascinating and terrifying account that is at once a work of academic scholarship and a startling exposÇ of a particularly virulent form of religious extremism. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: July 18, 1994

"Purple prose, flowery extended metaphors, and an obvious nostalgic longing for the 1960s mar what aspires to be an important study."
An alternately serious and silly look at the 60s as an era of spiritual change in the United States. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 1994

"I think so,'' he concludes."
Peskov, a correspondent for Komsomolskaya Pravda, tells the story of a Russian religious dissident who, in 1932, took his wife into the remote Siberian Taiga and remained there, effectively frozen in time, until the 1990s. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: July 1, 1994

"A heavily partisan but still valuable contribution to current debates within the American Catholic Church."
An inside view of the Catholic Church—not the Church of official dogma, but the Church as it lives and breathes daily in America. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >