Religion Book Reviews (page 174)

VIOLENCE AND COMPASSION by Dalai Lama
RELIGION
Released: Jan. 1, 1996

"Admirers of the Dalai Lama should not feel they have to add this to their collection."
French film writer Carriäre (The Return of Martin Guerre, etc.) does most of the talking in this set of conversations with Tibet's world-acclaimed religious leader. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 1996

"A timely reminder, as we enter a year of electoral politicking, that even the touchiest issues can be treated with intellectual honesty and a decent appreciation for opposing views."
A sound and spirited defense of the wall of separation between church and state. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 7, 1995

"A welcome association of sense and sensibility. (27 illustrations)"
Sanity, sanity, sanity, as Steiner squarely addresses a number of contemporary cultural conflicts and teases out their subtler meanings. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 6, 1995

"McClain's warm, wise, funny, and provocative book is must reading for all who work for a Jewish future."
Easily the most eloquent, impactive, and therapeutic treatment ever written about Jewry's sacred bogeyman. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Dec. 5, 1995

"Frequently hilarious, Roberts, as he himself admits, is presenting a history that fits his own needs."
Vivid travelogue combines with a polemic that Christianity was originally a Gnostic offshoot of Zoroastrianism in this intriguing, but highly partisan, attempt to discover the significance of the mysterious Wise Men. Read full book review >

LOVE AND SAINT AUGUSTINE by Hannah Arendt
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 4, 1995

"A revelation that may force us to reconsider the traditional interpretation of Arendt's work."
Now published in English for the first time, Arendt's 1929 doctoral dissertation offers insights into her later political and philosophical constructions. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"A potentially intriguing subject, but the authors miss the real story by taking such an oddly unrepresentative group of subjects."
Eleven marginally Jewish subjects talk about their lives as Jews in East, West, and united Germany. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"From the author of Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory (1989) and host of the PBS series of the same title, another incisive critique of the US religious scene."
Balmer (Religion/Barnard Coll.) compares the state of American Protestantism today with its boom in the '50s and suggests that a return to its antiestablishment and evangelical roots is needed. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"Written with the help of Orbach's daughter, this is totally compelling, and one of the rarer stories of the Holocaust. (illustrations, not seen)"
An exciting and unusual mixture of Holocaust journal, coming-of-age story, and memoir of life on the seedy underside of Berlin during WW II. Read full book review >
ALL RIVERS RUN TO THE SEA by Elie Wiesel
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"And he ceaselessly pricks the conscience of a world that thinks it is possible to have heard 'enough' about the Holocaust."
Drenched with sad yearning, yet narrated with simplicity in the limpid singsong that distinguishes his oral as well as written narrative, Wiesel's memoir reveals much, if not enough, about the man whose purpose in life has been to testify to the fate of his people. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"Although he makes a plausible case, Mack never gets near to actually proving that his version of Jesus lies behind the extant texts."
Mack (New Testament/School of Theology, Claremont) argues that the New Testament, far from representing historical facts, is the product of a process in which the countercultural sayings of Jesus were transformed into a universally acceptable myth. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"The book bears some signs of haste in its composition, but its somber and persuasive message should gain it wide and deserved attention."
A courageous book by one of the most distinguished living Irishmen (now pro-chancellor of the University of Dublin and an editor of both the Observer and the Atlantic Monthly), which slices through the superficial optimism currently prevailing about Northern Ireland. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >