Religion Book Reviews (page 175)

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"And despite Marsden's eloquence, the jury is still out on this divisive question."
A frank assertion that religious faith does indeed have a place in academia. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 29, 1997

"The source of the passion driving the Berrigans' deeds remains elusive, perhaps through no fault of the authors: The brothers, who confess to near-absolute certainty in their moral choices, harbor few of the doubts that help humanize and illumine most lives. (b&w illustrations, not seen)"
The story of two brothers and the turmoil, in the Catholic Church and American society, through which they have lived. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 15, 1997

"Having fallen victim, perhaps, to millennial madness, Strieber believes himself on a mission to save the world."
Strieber's ongoing narrative of his encounters with some form of higher intelligence—whether through actual visitations by aliens or a kind of altered consciousness—here becomes an increasingly incredible fable of time travel, prophecy, and visions of God. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 10, 1997

"Four stories that remind us of the human dimension of history. (10 illustrations, not seen)"
Four touching and tragic stories revealing the paradoxical nature of Italian fascism. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 8, 1997

"A vivid, excellently crafted journey through recent history, as well as through one man's life. (32 pages b&w photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
An American success story, shot through with praise for—and some well-placed criticism of—the author's adoptive country. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 6, 1997

"Ultimately, Behar's writings here are more personal essay than anthropological study, failing to clarify the application of her notion of anthropology that breaks your heart."
These readable, insightful essays are linked by the tension between the traditional academic view of anthropology as objective science and accomplished anthropologist Behar's (Univ. of Michigan) desire to admit the subjectivity, or ``vulnerability,'' that often plays a role in the work. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Eisenman's historical reconstruction makes for fascinating reading, but it never takes us beyond the realm of the merely plausible."
Gripping but partisan conjectures from Dead Sea Scrolls scholar Eisenman (Middle East Religions/ California State Univ.), arguing that St. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"This is a work of exemplary journalistic research and narrative, one highly recommended for anyone interested in either contemporary Jewry or the new Europe."
A beautifully written account of two generations in five Jewish families living in West and East Berlin, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and Poland. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Generally balanced, though, and challenging; sure to appeal to Peck's large following. (Literary Guild alternate selection)"
Peck's latest offering is the final installment of his ``Road Less Traveled'' trilogy (The Road Less Traveled, 1978, Further Along the Road Less Traveled, 1993) and a synthesis of his thinking to date. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

The prolific Highwater (The Language of Vision, 1994; Myth and Sexuality, 1990; etc.) once again explores the foundations of mythological structures, this time with the purpose of determining why homosexuality has been singled out as culturally deviant in contemporary Western society. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"A mine of information about the customs and spiritual life of the Orthodox Church, presented in a very human and accessible way."
With both humor and depth, NPR commentator and syndicated columnist Mathewes-Green describes a year in the richly liturgical life of the Eastern Orthodox Church, as experienced in a small Maryland parish founded by a group of recent converts. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Little X is a compelling story, despite an indifferent prose style, because it provides an honest, inside view of one of America's most controversial religious movements and perceptively points to social tensions of race, gender, and religious identity. ($40,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
The written history of the Nation of Islam has focused heavily on the movement's leaders, such as Elijah Muhammad and Malcolm X; it has been told from an almost exclusively male perspective; and it has virtually ignored the transitional period of the 1970s, when Elijah Muhammad's son transformed the movement into one more in keeping with orthodox Islam. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >