Religion Book Reviews (page 175)

RELIGION
Released: April 1, 1996

"Telushkin delivers a necessary tongue-lashing for a culture that needs to lash its tongue. (Author tour)"
An ethical self-help book for all of us who belittle lies, slander, and gossip as ``only words.'' According to Telushkin, a rabbi and popularizer of Jewish lore (Jewish Wisdom, 1994, etc.), it is easier to give up alcohol than to abandon our daily diet of verbal cruelties. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: April 1, 1996

"But, please—no books about people's personal encounters with the fallen angel."
Our communal obsessions seem to have shifted—at least in the area of supernatural beings: Angels are passÇ, the Devil is ``in.'' Andrew Delbanco calls for his resurrection; psychoanalyst Carl Goldberg uses the phrase ``speaking with the devil'' as a metaphor for his work with malevolent patients; Elaine Pagels scrutinizes Satan's roots. Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: April 1, 1996

"Intelligent and controversial collaboration of scholarship and journalism. (24 photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
Revolutionary thesis of German papyrologist Thiede and (London) Times assistant editor d'Ancona that the Magdalen Papyrus fragments of St. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 15, 1996

"It is likely to be a standard in its field for decades—more time than Wasserstein gives the vanishing diaspora of Europe."
A lucid and comprehensive chronicle of the perils of postwar European Jewry. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 6, 1996

"Marxism- Leninism than anything Solzhenitsyn published''—but a valuable introduction to an important and hitherto neglected figure. (illustrations, maps)"
The first biography of Grossman, who, though little known in the West, is regarded as one of the great Russian novelists of this century. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1996

"Passing no judgments, Christian writes with respect for the seers' Catholic faith and Spanish culture, which he does not share but has certainly entered into. (114 photos, not seen; 2 maps)"
Intelligent and carefully researched account of the religio-political setting for a wave of apparitions of the Virgin Mary in Spain on the eve of that country's Civil War. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1996

"Skeptics, however, are more likely to view it as the sad product of a New Age mother's remorse and unresolved grief."
A credulity-straining account by a deeply grieved mother of her son's brief and troubled life on earth, his suicide, and his soul's happier existence in another dimension. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1996

"Worthwhile if you haven't journeyed with Raphael before."
Raphael's ``greatest hits'': This collection of 13 essays offers remixes and reprises of some of his better-known material. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1996

"In the end, this narrative is at once too private and too impersonal—the reader floats on the surface of events and characters, unable to to enter into the Salamons' search for a safe place to raise their family. (photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
Bonfire of the Vanities film chronicler Salamon (The Devil's Candy, 1991) leaves Hollywood for sadder and more personal venues as she searches, none too successfully, to understand her family's history. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1996

"The author's polemical tone throughout must raise doubts about the reliability of his work. (Author tour)"
Carefully researched but basically slanted story of one year in the life of a ``typical'' American Catholic parish. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1996

A sometimes murky, frequently meandering excursion into the meaning of ancient Andean beliefs, arguing that in a series of sophisticated myths Incan soothsayers foretold their own civilization's doom at the hands of Pizarro and his conquistadors in 1532. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 1, 1996

"Walsh dramatically highlights tensions between Catholic dogma and Hollywood glitter, but greater insight into the Church would have given this study more weight. (32 b&w photos, not seen)"
A humorous but critical portrayal of the Catholic Church's censorship of Hollywood movies from WW I to the present. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >