Religion Book Reviews (page 175)

HISTORY
Released: March 20, 1995

"Those most likely to benefit from this excursion in self-help might be those who recognize it as raw material for satire."
The road less traveled has by now become the beaten path, and Schwartz—reporting a recent and exhaustive spiritual trek—doesn't leave discernible footprints on it. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 15, 1995

"Superficial treatment of a significant religious and psychological theme."
Accounts of dreams, waking visions, and near-death experiences featuring the figure of Jesus, with a running commentary by psychotherapist Sparrow. Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"Demanding but stimulating fare for those who believe that human events are ultimately responses to ideas and attitudes."
The director of the Florilogia Institute in Sonoma, Calif., uses literature, current events, and the Bible to argue that the efficacy of ritual violence in human affairs has been undermined by the Judaeo-Christian concern for the victim. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"Brilliant writing in the service of a disappointingly dogmatic positivism."
Controversial biblical scholar Crossan restates his thesis that the Gospel accounts of the death of Jesus tell us more about the polemics of the early Christians than about what really happened. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"Thankfully, Ferguson quotes liberally from well-informed and articulate critics of Israeli society, but this journal indicates that she has yet to join their ranks."
A slight and strident autobiographical account of an American academic's four-month stay on an Israeli kibbutz in 1992. Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"Best suited to a women's study group or Sunday school setting, the volume may be used as well for personal daily devotions."
A good, but less than earthshaking, discussion of biblical women, designed for study, reflection, and inspiration. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"Though the foregone conclusion of this tale precludes high drama, interested readers will find much here to think about."
McClory (The Man Who Beat Clout City, 1977) offers some prime details on a story that continues to reverberate through world Catholicism. Read full book review >
ASSIMILATION AND ITS DISCONTENTS by Barry Rubin
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"A first—but woefully incomplete—stab at understanding the main threat to Jewish continuity in the 21st century."
A reasoned but too narrowly argued historical brief against Jewish assimilation into Western culture. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1995

"Worthy stuff, but more detail than most readers will want."
A thorough, textured analysis of the sources and strategies of Martin Luther King's preaching and rhetoric. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"He coats standard, trickle-down mysticism with pseudo-scientific terms, hoping to make it easier for Western skeptics to swallow."
One scientist's hopeful meditations on the possibility of a consciousness beyond death. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1995

"A fascinating and well-written account."
An intelligent history of how Americans have tended to see the world as the battleground between absolute good and absolute evil. Read full book review >
AN ETHIC FOR ENEMIES by Jr. Shriver
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 1995

"For anyone concerned with the continual cycles of vengeance and retaliation in our world, Shriver's book offers a well-argued vision of hope."
A compelling case for forgiveness—traditionally thought of as the way to heal disputes between persons—as the route to better relations between peoples. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Morgan Matson
July 25, 2016

From Morgan Matson, the bestselling author of Since You’ve Been Gone, comes The Unexpected Everything, a feel-good YA novel of friendship, finding yourself, and all the joys in life that happen while you’re busy making other plans. Andie has a plan. And she always sticks to her plan. Future? A top-tier medical school. Dad? Avoid him as much as possible (which isn’t that hard considering he’s a Congressman and he’s never around). Friends? Palmer, Bri, and Toby—pretty much the most awesome people on the planet, who needs anyone else? Relationships? No one’s worth more than three weeks. So it’s no surprise that Andie’s got her summer all planned out too. Until a political scandal costs Andie her summer pre-med internship, and lands both she and Dad back in the same house together for the first time in years. Suddenly she’s doing things that aren’t Andie at all. “Romance fans will find plenty to enjoy, as Andie gradually lets down her guard and risks the messy and unpredictable wonder of first love,” our reviewer writes. “A novel best read on a lazy summer day with sand between the toes.” View video >