Religion Book Reviews (page 176)

HISTORY
Released: April 6, 1995

"As a model of candid and civil inter- ethnic dialogue, this book has an importance that transcends its seemingly narrow boundaries."
A conversation between a black and a Jew that cuts to the heart of the troubled relationship between the two peoples. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 2, 1995

"A welcome addition to the growing shelf of books on the American Jewish experience, though its grasp of history is not as firm as its mastery of sociology."
A sociological survey, with historical background, of the American Jewish community's current state. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1995

"For the moment, Peck seems to have run out of road."
Severe inflammation of the ego is in evidence as ex-therapist Peck (Further Along the Road Less Traveled, 1993, etc.) muses on life and recounts his 21-day tour of Great Britain's ancient megalithic sites. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: April 1, 1995

"Students of biblical history and the messianic idea can rest assured that they are in competent hands. (b&w photos, maps, not seen)"
A scholarly work with considerable contemporary relevance that traces the Jewish messianic idea through its many ancient manifestations. Read full book review >
JEWISH STATE OR ISRAELI NATION? by Boas Evron
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1995

"A pseudo-intellectual drive-by with a misfiring Uzi."
A jaded, outdated manifesto of post-Zionism by an Israeli journalist. Read full book review >

IN MY FATHER'S STUDY by Ben Orlove
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 31, 1995

"Like the study itself, some true gems mixed in with a lot of scrap paper. (30 photos, not seen)"
The life of an immigrant family, reassembled with the contents of one man's study. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 20, 1995

"Those most likely to benefit from this excursion in self-help might be those who recognize it as raw material for satire."
The road less traveled has by now become the beaten path, and Schwartz—reporting a recent and exhaustive spiritual trek—doesn't leave discernible footprints on it. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 15, 1995

"Superficial treatment of a significant religious and psychological theme."
Accounts of dreams, waking visions, and near-death experiences featuring the figure of Jesus, with a running commentary by psychotherapist Sparrow. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"Demanding but stimulating fare for those who believe that human events are ultimately responses to ideas and attitudes."
The director of the Florilogia Institute in Sonoma, Calif., uses literature, current events, and the Bible to argue that the efficacy of ritual violence in human affairs has been undermined by the Judaeo-Christian concern for the victim. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"Brilliant writing in the service of a disappointingly dogmatic positivism."
Controversial biblical scholar Crossan restates his thesis that the Gospel accounts of the death of Jesus tell us more about the polemics of the early Christians than about what really happened. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"Thankfully, Ferguson quotes liberally from well-informed and articulate critics of Israeli society, but this journal indicates that she has yet to join their ranks."
A slight and strident autobiographical account of an American academic's four-month stay on an Israeli kibbutz in 1992. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"Best suited to a women's study group or Sunday school setting, the volume may be used as well for personal daily devotions."
A good, but less than earthshaking, discussion of biblical women, designed for study, reflection, and inspiration. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >