Religion Book Reviews (page 176)

RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1996

"The author's polemical tone throughout must raise doubts about the reliability of his work. (Author tour)"
Carefully researched but basically slanted story of one year in the life of a ``typical'' American Catholic parish. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1996

A sometimes murky, frequently meandering excursion into the meaning of ancient Andean beliefs, arguing that in a series of sophisticated myths Incan soothsayers foretold their own civilization's doom at the hands of Pizarro and his conquistadors in 1532. Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 1, 1996

"Walsh dramatically highlights tensions between Catholic dogma and Hollywood glitter, but greater insight into the Church would have given this study more weight. (32 b&w photos, not seen)"
A humorous but critical portrayal of the Catholic Church's censorship of Hollywood movies from WW I to the present. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1996

"In sum, one can read this in lieu of spending an evening with a well-meaning but long-winded relative or use it, sparingly, as a resouce for insight into traditional Native American practices."
The life and healing practices of a Muskogee Creek medicine man who seems never to have met a disease he couldn't cure. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1996

"Given its limitations, the book will chiefly be of interest to students of medieval Jewish history. (History Book Club selection)"
A plodding study of the background, dynamics, and historical treatments of the Rhineland massacre of Jews in the First Crusade. Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1996

"With this anthology topping out at 560 pages, Rosenberg could have been more discriminating in his selections and their presentation."
A generally strained anthology, with several memorable individual essays. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Feb. 14, 1996

"One hopes that other historians will follow McDannell's bold lead and attend to this neglected aspect of religious expression. (100 b&w photos and 24 color plates, not seen)"
A groundbreaking, impressively researched, and kitsch-filled exploration of how Americans' sacred ``stuff'' both shapes and reflects their religious beliefs. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Feb. 5, 1996

"This collection of identity conflicts seems to be struggling for its own identity."
A narrow examination of the conflicting concepts of identity shared by the masses of marginal Jews. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"It does, however, convey with remarkable immediacy one man's wartime anguish and is valuable for what it reveals about human nature during times of extreme duress. (map and 9 photos, not seen)"
The story of a Polish Jew who faced moral as well as emotional anguish in the Holocaust, told in his own tortured words. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"This essential collection captures the best of a leading thinker and doer who influenced many contemporaries with an ancient prophetic tradition that he made new."
Collected essays by Rabbi Heschel (190772), one of our century's most eloquent and challenging theologians. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"The Learning Channel will begin airing a series based on this book in mid-January. (four-color and b&w photos, line drawings)"
Egyptologist Rohl compellingly presents a groundbreaking analysis of archaeological evidence for the historicity of the early books of the Old Testament. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"There is an introduction by Robert Jay Lifton."
Seliger is a gutsy photographer. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >