Religion Book Reviews (page 176)

HISTORY
Released: Nov. 16, 1994

"A pathbreaking, superb contribution to Holocaust studies."
Bauer offers an eye-opening look into the following question: Could Jewish leaders in America, England, Palestine, and occupied Europe itself have ransomed significant numbers of their brethren? Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Nov. 10, 1994

"But this memoir is sad too for what it reveals about the author, who seems largely unable to winnow out much of substance from a great deal of oral fluff."
Sometimes a memoir writer makes the unfortunate decision to turn a potentially good 20-page article into a work many times that length. Read full book review >

THE FATHER by Alfred Habegger
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"This deserves an honored place on the shelves with previous biographies of the James family by Leon Edel, R.W.B. Lewis, and Jean Strouse."
Can a minor literary figure sustain interest throughout a major biography? Read full book review >
A TREMOR OF BLISS by Paul Elie
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Valuable for inspiration, but also for information—the details of the lives and deaths of many saints are here, refracted through 20 idiosyncratic, often powerful points of view."
Lambent prose and a general lack of self-indulgence characterize these essays on the Catholic canon of saints. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Despite occasional redundancies—only natural given the 400 pages of commentary on a brief text—this book is absorbing and provocative."
A generally superb collection of both traditional and unorthodox readings of the Book of Ruth. Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Scholarly, carefully reasoned, and lucidly written, Meier's portrait of Jesus as a fiery, wonder-working prophet rather than the gentle teacher of Christian tradition may continue the controversy (with believers and nonbelievers alike) initiated in Volume One."
This second volume of Meier's magisterial attempt to create a ``consensus document'' about the historical Jesus on which scholars of all faiths could agree makes some tantalizing assertions about Jesus' public ministry. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"This analysis of an important American educational story is somewhat plodding and dry, but the end result is coherent and insightful."
An authoritative study of the emergence of Jewish studies on the American campus. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Full of sound and fury, signifying very little."
An unfocused harangue that leaves the reader feeling as little sympathy for the author as for the traditional Jewish institution she attacks: the separation of men and women during prayer. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"The lack of footnotes or other documentation is further evidence that this is an intellectually shoddy book. (32 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
Caveat emptor: This is most definitely not ``the history'' of the Jews. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"A lively, penetrating follow-up to Holocaust readings that speaks volumes about the resiliency of the Jewish people."
A richly descriptive and insightful survey of post-Holocaust European Jewry. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Oct. 21, 1994

"He's just alluding to sources and passages and conversing about them. (Jewish Book Club dual main selection)"
Rabbi Telushkin (Jewish Humor, 1992, etc.) takes full advantage of Judaism's culture of commentary in this grab bag of quotations from Genesis and the Talmud to Samuel Goldwyn (``Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist ought to have his head examined''). Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 21, 1994

"Shallow, but exciting all the same. (8 pages of photos, not seen)"
A lively, albeit not very scholarly, account of Jan Karski's role in the WW II Polish underground. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >