Religion Book Reviews (page 177)

OUT OF EGYPT by Andre Aciman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A skillful portrayal of an extraordinary clan."
Aciman (French Literature/Princeton) delivers a clear- eyed eulogy of a lost past and a family in decline. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A rare work that successfully distills a whole philosophical debate into a few accessible pages."
A crisp and spirited argument for the near-total separation of church and state, by a former New York federal judge (Partisan Justice, 1980). Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A fascinating and important social history of religion."
Well-presented and engaging essays, by some of the foremost religious scholars working today, examining the histories of 12 diverse religious institutions. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"For its sensitivity to the rights of victims and defendants alike, a remarkable work."
This sharp, sensible, ``angry'' book explores how four classes of disempowered Americans look to the criminal justice system to vindicate past grievances, and how the courts too often betray them. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"The legions of scroll aficionados around the world can now read of conflicts both ancient and modern in a lively and informative new book. (Book-of-the-Month/Quality Paperback Book Club alternate selections; author tour)"
The freshest, most elegantly written of the new books about the origins of the Dead Sea Scrolls (see Reclaiming the Dead Sea Scrolls, p. 1107, The Hidden Scrolls, p. 1108). Read full book review >

MEMOIRS OF A WARSAW GHETTO FIGHTER by Simha Rotem
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"4 pages photos, not seen)."
The candid, fast-moving memoir of a significant member of the Warsaw Ghetto's fighting underground. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A piece of American exotica sadly mishandled."
A meandering journalistic testimony of the author's experience with a strange southern Christian sect. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Non-devotees of the New Age and nonreaders of Markides's previous efforts are apt to be left out in the cold as the current volume approaches its own hidden wisdom in nearly content-free language."
Further ruminations concerning the mysticism, knowledge, and nature of ultimate reality add little to previous volumes by the same author. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Dec. 9, 1994

"30 b&w photos, not seen)."
A scholarly survey of how the figure of the Antichrist has been understood through the centuries, from Second Temple Judaism to present-day America. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"With a more lucid tone, this account of a medicine man's unusual life might have attracted a readership beyond fans of Boyd's previous works."
Boyd (Mystics, Magicians, and Medicine People, 1989) serves as traveling secretary and appreciative witness to the actions of Mad Bear, a Tuscarora medicine man, in this pedantic account of their travels in the late 1970s. Read full book review >
RASTAFARI by Barry Chevannes
RELIGION
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"Scholarly and cautious about making factual claims without sufficient data, Chevannes is also unabashedly sympathetic to the Rastafari."
Chevannes (Sociology/Univ. of the West Indies, Jamaica) uses oral history, interviews, and a good deal of historical interpretation and synthesis to present a history of Rastafarianism, the Jamaican-based pan-African movement. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"A significant, lucid presentation of a little-known slice of Jewish history, the history of science, and the history of racism. (11 illustrations, not seen)"
A thorough and fascinating study of how 19th-century gentile and Jewish scientists worked to find a scientific understanding of race and of how that labor affected their views of Jews. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >