Religion Book Reviews (page 177)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"An appealing, if hyped-up, primer for grass-roots social and moral renewal. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
How a community inspired by faith can combat crack use, sexual abuse, and other social woes, by the ``Minister of Liberation'' of San Francisco's Glide Memorial Church. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"It's debatable whether Akenson's concept of resurgent Old Testament behavior is more theory than reality—his idea that Israel will move ever closer to the covenanting pattern seems confounded by the recent elections—but the author's sweep and grasp are impressive."
Bold, often brilliant, but perhaps strained attempt by Akenson (History/Queen's Univ.) to trace how ancient Hebrew scriptures have ``formed the fundamental pattern of mind of the three societies'' of South Africa, Israel, and Northern Ireland. Read full book review >

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Sept. 23, 1992

"The extensive notes and bibliography help document shifting attitudes toward romance and marriage, but a topic like this deserves a little passion."
A scholarly study of Jewish sexuality that is neither sexy nor particularly Jewish. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 18, 1992

"As such, far more valuable than recent agitprop on similar topics, such as Sherry Anderson and Patricia Hopkins's The Feminine Face of God (1991)."
A smooth weave of oral histories and scholarly analysis that shows that Catholic women are just like everyone else. Read full book review >
THE TE OF PIGLET by Benjamin Hoff
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 15, 1992

"Piglet bring home the bacon. (Illustrated with 51 line drawings from the original Pooh books. However did they dare?)"
Ten years later, a sequel to the runaway bestseller The Tao of Pooh. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Sept. 9, 1992

"Deftly mixing history, countless interviews, and an analysis of recent events country by country, this is a valuable resource for those interested in what the future might hold for Eastern Europe and the Jews who choose to stay there. (Photo insert—not seen.)"
An astute, challenging assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of Jewish communities formerly behind the Iron Curtain, by Jerusalem journalist/sociologist Hoffman. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Sept. 4, 1992

"Good feelings galore, but next time, hold those maxims."
A Conservative rabbi (The Healer of Shattered Hearts, 1990) ponders the ways by which words link God and humans. Read full book review >
THE CREATIONISTS by Ronald L. Numbers
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 2, 1992

"Numbers's objectivity, eye for anecdote, and knack for deciphering the enigmas of science and pseudoscience make this the best history of creationism to date—a landmark work in the field. (Twenty-four b&w photographs—not seen.)"
A beautifully balanced and comprehensive history of ``scientific creationism.'' Although Numbers (History of Science and Medicine/Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; Prophetess of Health, 1976) is a staunch evolutionist, he professes sympathy for creationists, a product of his Seventh-Day Adventist childhood. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"More personal information about Blank would have been welcome; even so, a delightfully offbeat travelogue."
Part travel-journal, part retelling of an Indian epic, part cultural and political analysis, this first book by a former editor of Tokyo's Asahi Evening News is both eclectic and ambitious. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Less the sound of one hand clapping than of hands, mind, and heart working together to lead a sanctified life—and, as such, a sound corrective to Western misunderstandings about Zen. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs.)"
A myth-shattering foray behind the walls of a Korean Zen Buddhist monastery. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Novel, to say the least—and despite the weird conclusions, a solid introduction to the subject. (Illustrations.)"
A theological Tootsie Roll pop from MacGregor (Philosophy/USC): a tasty study of beliefs about life after death, with a gooey mess at the center—the author's own decidedly unusual views on the matter. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"A highly readable study that probes the unprecedented scarring and healing of some of this century's most remarkable victims."
The first book-length study to document and analyze the ordeals and successes of immigrant Holocaust survivors. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >