Religion Book Reviews (page 177)

RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"Though the foregone conclusion of this tale precludes high drama, interested readers will find much here to think about."
McClory (The Man Who Beat Clout City, 1977) offers some prime details on a story that continues to reverberate through world Catholicism. Read full book review >
ASSIMILATION AND ITS DISCONTENTS by Barry Rubin
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"A first—but woefully incomplete—stab at understanding the main threat to Jewish continuity in the 21st century."
A reasoned but too narrowly argued historical brief against Jewish assimilation into Western culture. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1995

"Worthy stuff, but more detail than most readers will want."
A thorough, textured analysis of the sources and strategies of Martin Luther King's preaching and rhetoric. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"He coats standard, trickle-down mysticism with pseudo-scientific terms, hoping to make it easier for Western skeptics to swallow."
One scientist's hopeful meditations on the possibility of a consciousness beyond death. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1995

"A fascinating and well-written account."
An intelligent history of how Americans have tended to see the world as the battleground between absolute good and absolute evil. Read full book review >

AN ETHIC FOR ENEMIES by Jr. Shriver
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 1995

"For anyone concerned with the continual cycles of vengeance and retaliation in our world, Shriver's book offers a well-argued vision of hope."
A compelling case for forgiveness—traditionally thought of as the way to heal disputes between persons—as the route to better relations between peoples. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1995

"This story received considerable media attention in 1992; for those who missed it, Watterson tells it in historical and social context—a bit too much so."
A moving, though overlong, account of the triumph of patience and tolerance over bigotry. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"Despite a tendency to get lost in esoteric byways, an engagingly ambitious tour of Latino culture, notable for its formidable breadth."
Part history and part cultural encyclopedia, a sophisticated- -sometimes too sophisticated—discussion of Latino identity as displayed in art, literature, and popular culture. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"A wonderfully erudite debut."
Literary and literate biblical exegesis from Jerusalem- based teacher and lecturer Zornberg. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Feb. 15, 1995

"Meant as a support mechanism for women who leave the church, the volume also provides an intriguing glimpse into their thoughts."
An interesting and largely rewarding volume that discusses the relationship between women and the Roman Catholic Church. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"The evenhanded everything-and-everyone approach may alienate readers committed to one Jewish point of view, and the book has several unproven assumptions stated as facts—yet Ariel provides a remarkably rich and useful one-volume introduction to millennia of Jewish beliefs."
An eclectic exploration of the abiding elements of Jewish belief, covering major ethical, ritual, and theological topics. Read full book review >
SAINT PETER by Michael Grant
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"A mostly derivative work in which the author's insights are limited by a naive positivism. (Book-of-the-Month Club/Quality Paperback Book Club alternate selections; History Book Club main selection)"
A prolific classical historian attempts to uncover the ``historical'' Peter from evidence in the New Testament. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >