Religion Book Reviews (page 177)

HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1996

"Passing no judgments, Christian writes with respect for the seers' Catholic faith and Spanish culture, which he does not share but has certainly entered into. (114 photos, not seen; 2 maps)"
Intelligent and carefully researched account of the religio-political setting for a wave of apparitions of the Virgin Mary in Spain on the eve of that country's Civil War. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1996

"Skeptics, however, are more likely to view it as the sad product of a New Age mother's remorse and unresolved grief."
A credulity-straining account by a deeply grieved mother of her son's brief and troubled life on earth, his suicide, and his soul's happier existence in another dimension. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1996

"Worthwhile if you haven't journeyed with Raphael before."
Raphael's ``greatest hits'': This collection of 13 essays offers remixes and reprises of some of his better-known material. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1996

"In the end, this narrative is at once too private and too impersonal—the reader floats on the surface of events and characters, unable to to enter into the Salamons' search for a safe place to raise their family. (photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
Bonfire of the Vanities film chronicler Salamon (The Devil's Candy, 1991) leaves Hollywood for sadder and more personal venues as she searches, none too successfully, to understand her family's history. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1996

"The author's polemical tone throughout must raise doubts about the reliability of his work. (Author tour)"
Carefully researched but basically slanted story of one year in the life of a ``typical'' American Catholic parish. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1996

A sometimes murky, frequently meandering excursion into the meaning of ancient Andean beliefs, arguing that in a series of sophisticated myths Incan soothsayers foretold their own civilization's doom at the hands of Pizarro and his conquistadors in 1532. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 1, 1996

"Walsh dramatically highlights tensions between Catholic dogma and Hollywood glitter, but greater insight into the Church would have given this study more weight. (32 b&w photos, not seen)"
A humorous but critical portrayal of the Catholic Church's censorship of Hollywood movies from WW I to the present. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1996

"In sum, one can read this in lieu of spending an evening with a well-meaning but long-winded relative or use it, sparingly, as a resouce for insight into traditional Native American practices."
The life and healing practices of a Muskogee Creek medicine man who seems never to have met a disease he couldn't cure. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1996

"Given its limitations, the book will chiefly be of interest to students of medieval Jewish history. (History Book Club selection)"
A plodding study of the background, dynamics, and historical treatments of the Rhineland massacre of Jews in the First Crusade. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1996

"With this anthology topping out at 560 pages, Rosenberg could have been more discriminating in his selections and their presentation."
A generally strained anthology, with several memorable individual essays. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Feb. 14, 1996

"One hopes that other historians will follow McDannell's bold lead and attend to this neglected aspect of religious expression. (100 b&w photos and 24 color plates, not seen)"
A groundbreaking, impressively researched, and kitsch-filled exploration of how Americans' sacred ``stuff'' both shapes and reflects their religious beliefs. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Feb. 5, 1996

"This collection of identity conflicts seems to be struggling for its own identity."
A narrow examination of the conflicting concepts of identity shared by the masses of marginal Jews. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Laini Taylor
March 27, 2017

In bestselling YA writer Laini Taylor’s new fantasy novel, Strange the Dreamer, the dream chooses the dreamer, not the other way around—and Lazlo Strange, war orphan and junior librarian, has always feared that his dream chose poorly. Since he was five years old he's been obsessed with the mythic lost city of Weep, but it would take someone bolder than he to cross half the world in search of it. Then a stunning opportunity presents itself, in the person of a hero called the Godslayer and a band of legendary warriors, and he has to seize his chance to lose his dream forever. What happened in Weep two hundred years ago to cut it off from the rest of the world? What exactly did the Godslayer slay that went by the name of god? And what is the mysterious problem he now seeks help in solving? “Lovers of intricate worldbuilding and feverish romance will find this enthralling,” our critic writes. View video >