Religion Book Reviews (page 177)

RELIGION
Released: Jan. 12, 1995

"What promises to be a powerful analysis appears more and more to reflect Klein's own struggles to reconcile Buddhism and feminism, not accessible to most readers because of its technicality."
A unique though complicated investigation of Buddhism and feminism. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 3, 1995

"Though the volume could have benefited from further editing (and some ethnocentric bias is evident in the use of generic, non- tribal specific terms like 'Great Spirit' and 'conjurer'), the book is nonetheless a major contribution to the study of Native American history and religious studies."
This excellent collection of essays probes the responses of one Native American tribe to the forces of Christianity. Read full book review >

OUT OF EGYPT by Andre Aciman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A skillful portrayal of an extraordinary clan."
Aciman (French Literature/Princeton) delivers a clear- eyed eulogy of a lost past and a family in decline. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A rare work that successfully distills a whole philosophical debate into a few accessible pages."
A crisp and spirited argument for the near-total separation of church and state, by a former New York federal judge (Partisan Justice, 1980). Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A fascinating and important social history of religion."
Well-presented and engaging essays, by some of the foremost religious scholars working today, examining the histories of 12 diverse religious institutions. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"For its sensitivity to the rights of victims and defendants alike, a remarkable work."
This sharp, sensible, ``angry'' book explores how four classes of disempowered Americans look to the criminal justice system to vindicate past grievances, and how the courts too often betray them. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"The legions of scroll aficionados around the world can now read of conflicts both ancient and modern in a lively and informative new book. (Book-of-the-Month/Quality Paperback Book Club alternate selections; author tour)"
The freshest, most elegantly written of the new books about the origins of the Dead Sea Scrolls (see Reclaiming the Dead Sea Scrolls, p. 1107, The Hidden Scrolls, p. 1108). Read full book review >
MEMOIRS OF A WARSAW GHETTO FIGHTER by Simha Rotem
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"4 pages photos, not seen)."
The candid, fast-moving memoir of a significant member of the Warsaw Ghetto's fighting underground. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A piece of American exotica sadly mishandled."
A meandering journalistic testimony of the author's experience with a strange southern Christian sect. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Non-devotees of the New Age and nonreaders of Markides's previous efforts are apt to be left out in the cold as the current volume approaches its own hidden wisdom in nearly content-free language."
Further ruminations concerning the mysticism, knowledge, and nature of ultimate reality add little to previous volumes by the same author. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Dec. 9, 1994

"30 b&w photos, not seen)."
A scholarly survey of how the figure of the Antichrist has been understood through the centuries, from Second Temple Judaism to present-day America. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"With a more lucid tone, this account of a medicine man's unusual life might have attracted a readership beyond fans of Boyd's previous works."
Boyd (Mystics, Magicians, and Medicine People, 1989) serves as traveling secretary and appreciative witness to the actions of Mad Bear, a Tuscarora medicine man, in this pedantic account of their travels in the late 1970s. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Morgan Matson
July 25, 2016

The Unexpected Everything is a YA feel-good story of friendship, finding yourself, and all the joys in life that happen while you’re busy making other plans. Andie has a plan. And she always sticks to her plan. Future? A top-tier medical school. Dad? Avoid him as much as possible (which isn’t that hard considering he’s a Congressman and he’s never around). Friends? Palmer, Bri, and Toby—pretty much the most awesome people on the planet, who needs anyone else? Relationships? No one’s worth more than three weeks. So it’s no surprise that Andie’s got her summer all planned out too. Until a political scandal costs Andie her summer pre-med internship, and lands both she and Dad back in the same house together for the first time in years. Suddenly she’s doing things that aren’t Andie at all. “Romance fans will find plenty to enjoy, as Andie gradually lets down her guard and risks the messy and unpredictable wonder of first love,” our reviewer writes. “A novel best read on a lazy summer day with sand between the toes.” View video >