Religion Book Reviews (page 177)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 17, 1993

"But her singular conversion is memorable, as is her vivid description of Jewish Orthodoxy in all its severity and majesty."
The emotional autobiography of a woman whose religious odyssey begins in Orthodox Judaism and ends in Roman Catholicism. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 17, 1993

"The legacy of Martin Luther King in all its glory, and more proof that the struggle for social justice may have religion at its core."
Freedman (Journalism/Columbia), author of the acclaimed Small Victories (1990), about the tribulations of an N.Y.C. English teacher, turns his attention to a Brooklyn minister and his can-do church—with riveting results. Read full book review >

LONG QUIET HIGHWAY by Natalie Goldberg
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 15, 1993

Goldberg, author of two popular Zen-inspired writing guides (Wild Mind, 1990; Writing Down the Bones, 1986), tells in simple, dead-honest prose the story of her ``awakening'' to writing and to life. ``Americans,'' Goldberg says, ``see writing as a way to break through their own inertia and become awake, to connect with their deepest selves.'' This way works, she insists, but ``it is hard. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Masson eloquently portrays the pretense and vanity of a would- be spiritual teacher, but it seems that he doth protest too much- -and, not for the first time, his words come off as more arrogant than wise."
In Final Analysis (1990), Masson attacked those who trained him as a psychoanalyst. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 20, 1993

"Imperative reading for all concerned with bias crimes and the temptation to fight arson with arson. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
The full story of the KKK's bombing of Jewish targets in the late 60's, and of the effective but illegal measures taken by the FBI to stop the violence. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Jan. 15, 1993

"Women Who Run With the Wolves will feel comfortable with Leonard's sense of women as nature's exiles, her use of myth and dreams for elaboration, and her validation of feminine mystery."
A vigorous exploration by Jungian analyst Leonard (The Wounded Woman, 1982, etc.—not reviewed) of the ``Madwoman'' archetype, an unsettling image whose negative energy, she suggests, must be recognized and rechanneled as a positive force. Read full book review >
MEMORY FIELDS by Shlomo Breznitz
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 7, 1993

"Likely to be a classic of Holocaust literature: not to be missed."
By authority of his excellent prose, discomfiting honesty, risky form, and shattering fidelity to the traps of remembering the nearly unbearable, Breznitz has produced a Holocaust memoir that stands with the best of them. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Jan. 6, 1993

"Well detailed—but the astonishing adventure of HPB's life too often gets lost beneath Cranston's piousness. (Photographs—not seen.)"
One of the towering—and most controversial—figures in occult history, Helena Petrovna Blavatsky (1831-91) cofounded the Theosophical Society and profoundly influenced the spread of Eastern and (many would say) pseudo-Eastern spiritual doctrines in the West. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Philosophical-minded readers will relish Murdoch's argument, surely one of the most elegant and impassioned metaphysical forays in recent years."
Though best known as a novelist, Murdoch (The Message to the Planet, 1989, etc.)—as her years teaching at Oxford attest—is a notable philosopher as well (Acastos, 1986, etc.). Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"These essays can't be said to chart unexplored regions, but the ground Ehrenfeld covers gets a good and thorough turning."
Ehrenfeld (Biology/Rutgers; The Arrogance of Humanism, 1978, etc.) lambastes some richly deserving hate objects—greedheads, death merchants, control freaks, lusters after power, mossbacks, and scofflaws—folks busy turning planet Earth into a spiritual and environmental cesspool. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Lively but unconvincing. (Thirty halftones, 10 line drawings—not seen.)"
An erudite argument that religion is ``systematic anthropomorphism: the attribution of human characteristics to nonhuman things or events.'' Students of religion and philosophy may sniff a familiar bone here. Read full book review >
CHAIM WEIZMANN by Jehuda Reinharz
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Not so much compelling as admirably—perhaps definitively- -detailed. (Photographs.)"
Well-documented but slow-moving second volume in Reinharz's monumental three-volume biography of Israel's first president (Chaim Weizmann: The Making of a Zionist Leader, 1985). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Sabaa Tahir
August 4, 2015

Sabaa Tahir’s novel An Ember in the Ashes reveals a world inspired by ancient Rome and defined by brutality. Seventeen-year-old Laia has grown up with one rule for survival: Never challenge the Empire. But when Laia’s brother Darin is arrested for treason, she leaves behind everything she knows, risking her life to try and save him. She enlists help from the rebels whose extensive underground network may lead to Darin. Their help comes with a price, though. Laia must infiltrate the Empire’s greatest military academy as a spy. Elias is the Empire’s finest soldier—and its most unwilling one. Thrown together by chance and united by their hatred of the Empire, Laia and Elias will soon discover that their fates are intertwined—and that their choices may change the destiny of the entire Empire. We talk to An Ember in the Ashes author Sabaa Tahir this week on Kirkus TV. View video >