Religion Book Reviews (page 177)

RELIGION
Released: May 1, 1995

"But despite minor flaws, he writes with the kind of balance between imaginative daring and explicatory clarity that has become academia's rarest commodity."
A fascinating combination of a sometimes poetic ``love song'' to and a crisp structural analysis of Judaism's magnum opus, the Babylonian Talmud. Read full book review >
CATHOLICS ON THE EDGE by Tim Unsworth
RELIGION
Released: May 1, 1995

"Compelling, though it will probably appeal primarily to American Catholics who feel in some way abandoned by a Church that they will nonetheless not desert."
A warm and highly readable discussion of the uneasy relationship many American Catholics today have with their Church. Read full book review >

EMMA LAZARUS IN HER WORLD by Bette Roth Young
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1995

"Instructive, but by no means the final word on the subject."
A short biographical corrective regarding the Jewish- American folk hero, and some previously unpublished correspondence, both disappointingly slight. Read full book review >
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: April 26, 1995

"Overall, a finely nuanced, beautifully written work, one that is rich in case studies and should help clinicians and patients alike to move therapy beyond the morally sterile culture of narcissism in which it's too often stuck."
A ringing, persuasive call for injecting moral considerations- -both personal and political— into the often self-oriented world of psychotherapy. Read full book review >
GOD by Jack Miles
RELIGION
Released: April 14, 1995

"A flawed but able telling of a story that's not easy to comprehend, much less articulate. (First printing of 35,000; Book-of-the-Month Club/Quality Paperback Book Club selections; author tour)"
This learned and insightful approach to talking about God is a theological education in itself. Read full book review >

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: April 12, 1995

"No facile synthesis of the two systems here, but rather a thoughtful account that allows their paths to converge and diverge without losing sight of the distinctive contributions of each to deeper self-understanding."
An intriguing, if only partly successful, effort to apply Buddhist insights, particularly from meditation, to patient- therapist dynamics. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 6, 1995

"As a model of candid and civil inter- ethnic dialogue, this book has an importance that transcends its seemingly narrow boundaries."
A conversation between a black and a Jew that cuts to the heart of the troubled relationship between the two peoples. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 2, 1995

"A welcome addition to the growing shelf of books on the American Jewish experience, though its grasp of history is not as firm as its mastery of sociology."
A sociological survey, with historical background, of the American Jewish community's current state. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1995

"For the moment, Peck seems to have run out of road."
Severe inflammation of the ego is in evidence as ex-therapist Peck (Further Along the Road Less Traveled, 1993, etc.) muses on life and recounts his 21-day tour of Great Britain's ancient megalithic sites. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: April 1, 1995

"Students of biblical history and the messianic idea can rest assured that they are in competent hands. (b&w photos, maps, not seen)"
A scholarly work with considerable contemporary relevance that traces the Jewish messianic idea through its many ancient manifestations. Read full book review >
JEWISH STATE OR ISRAELI NATION? by Boas Evron
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1995

"A pseudo-intellectual drive-by with a misfiring Uzi."
A jaded, outdated manifesto of post-Zionism by an Israeli journalist. Read full book review >
IN MY FATHER'S STUDY by Ben Orlove
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 31, 1995

"Like the study itself, some true gems mixed in with a lot of scrap paper. (30 photos, not seen)"
The life of an immigrant family, reassembled with the contents of one man's study. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jeff Chang
September 20, 2016

In the provocative essays in journalist Jeff Chang’s new book We Gon’ Be Alright, Chang takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, personal writing, and cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism. Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. “He implores readers to listen, act, and become involved with today’s activists, who offer ‘new ways to see our past and our present,’ ” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.” View video >