Religion Book Reviews (page 178)

GOD AND MAMMON IN AMERICA by Robert Wuthnow
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 21, 1994

"There is, however, enough to attract the interested layperson as well."
An interesting but inconclusive look at the relationship between religion and money in contemporary America. Read full book review >
JEWISH RENEWAL by Michael Lerner
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 21, 1994

"Lots of mind-numbing analysis and little inspiration for Jews seeking a religious expression for their political convictions."
Michael Lerner has found God, and he wants other alienated progressive Jews to find God, too. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Sept. 15, 1994

"This dense, authoritative book demands and deserves an attentive reading and offers rewards few recent historical narratives can match."
An absorbing, challenging work of ``bottom-up'' history that gives a voice to the unlettered and the disempowered. Read full book review >
THE PHYSICS OF IMMORTALITY by Frank J. Tipler
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 5, 1994

"Tipler is wrestling with issues of enormous importance, but in the end his answers seem highly idiosyncratic and unlikely either to convert the skeptics or to satisfy the religious. (20 line drawings) (Quality Paperback Book Club selection; author tour)"
A scientific argument that foresees the evolution of computer intelligence into an equivalent of God is likely to be greeted with skepticism by the majority of readers, and those who wade through this densely argued text are likely to emerge more puzzled than enlightened. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 2, 1994

"A rich assemblage of Jewish history, but with the disconcerting organization of a patchwork quilt. (50 b&w photos, not seen)"
A compendium of elegy, emotive description, and thorough research capturing past and present Jewish life in East-Central Europe. Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"If the idea of Christianity is to embrace the teachings of Christ, you have an infinite range of choices of how to express that faith,'' the rest of the book will lead readers to believe he doesn't mean it."
This primer on the beliefs of the Roman Catholic Church provides useful information for the uninitiated but ultimately falls under the weight of the author's extreme bias in favor of his faith. Read full book review >
THE HISTORICAL FIGURE OF JESUS by E.P. Sanders
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Highly readable, this book will be of interest to scholars and accessible to general readers as well. (History Book Club main selection; Book-of-the-Month Club/Quality Paperback Book Club alternate selections)"
A valuable contribution to the evaluation of our knowledge about Jesus by a noted bible scholar. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Quite readable on the academic scale, but does not push any of the thematic buttons that would indicate a potential for crossing over into a mass market audience."
This mature ethnography of the rural east Indian village of Bisipara in the 1950s captures the spirit of life in a small community isolated from the outside world. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"For all its interdisciplinary breadth and originality, this reads like a beery breeze-shooting session with a college prof. (16 pages of b&w drawings, maps, not seen) (Author tour)"
In the latest leg of an idiosyncratic intellectual journey, Pellegrino looks at the stories of the Old Testament through the lenses of genetics, paleontology, and archaeology. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"It is the account of a group of people determined to make a difference—and of those who made a difference to them."
A poignant, heartfelt account of caring for children dying of AIDS. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 9, 1994

"Vivid, lighthearted, and unself-consciously profound."
An affectionate glimpse at the worlds of Japan and Zen. Read full book review >
HARD TRAVEL TO SACRED PLACES by Rudolph Wurlitzer
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 5, 1994

"Go elsewhere for all four."
A Southeast Asia travelogue that looks for spiritual sustenance but instead finds distraction in spiritual tourism and lengthy quotation. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >