Religion Book Reviews (page 178)

RELIGION
Released: May 1, 1992

"Remarkable ideas remarkably set forth."
Bloom wanders a bit, away from Yale into "the Evening Land" of America and its churches—and reconstructs a remarkable diagram of the religious imagination. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1992

"Pretty slim pickings: a few nice bits sunk in a sea of platitudes."
More of Merton's spirituality for the modern age, here in the form of talks given to nuns on retreat at the Abbey of Gethsemani in Kentucky. Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: April 27, 1992

"A decent source book, then, but a total failure as an argument."
Biblical historiography, with an edge, by an Oxford don whose sword is too unwieldy for his prey. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 27, 1992

"Reading this memoir is a bit like that—you come out shivering but cleansed. (Thirty-four photographs.)"
Salsitz was born in 1920 in the Polish town of Kolbuszowa, population 4000, half Jewish, half Polish. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: April 25, 1992

A live-wire account of Franklin's 13 years as a disciple of the notorious collector of Rolls-Royces and hungry souls. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: April 1, 1992

"Not as much fun as might be hoped as Hancock digs through literary and bibical texts while convincing himself that the Ark exists. (Sixteen pp. of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
English journalist Hancock retells the circumstances and thoughts that led to his discovery that the Lost Ark of the Covenant really exists. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 27, 1992

"Jewishness that, ironically—given the title—seems more involved in discarding remnants than in saving them."
An eloquent exploration of the many facets of Jewish identity in America. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 20, 1992

"Historians and sociologists—and, probably, Jews and New Englanders—will find Goldstein's study useful and diverting, but its subject is too narrow for just about everyone else. (Twenty b&w photos—not seen.)"
A chronicle of Jewish settlement and assimilation in three Maine towns—Bangor, Mount Desert Island, and Calais—during the first half of this century, well told by a sociologist native to the region. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 9, 1992

"An innovative treatment, muddied slightly by Feuerstein's slack writing style and tendency to overstatement. (Illustrations.)"
Here, Feuerstein (Holy Madness, 1991) tackles the spiritual potential of sex—comparing and contrasting motifs and practices from neolithic to neo-pagan times to conclude that we need to reconnect with the ancient experience of the energy of sex. ``Our civilization encourages us to neglect the lived body, even to ignore and deprecate it,'' writes Feuerstein. ``This dovetails with the Christian ideology that the body is corrupt and that we must therefore place our attention on the Eternal, the paradise beyond the finite human body and its concerns.'' Feuerstein contrasts our disembodied, guilt-filled state with neolithic Goddess cults that purportedly encouraged—and worshipped—a magically potent, boundlessly creative female sexuality. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: March 1, 1992

"For cooks without a lot of training or ambition, an attractive, varied, broadening, and handy collection. (Photographs.)"
Thai, Italian, Mexican, and French food show up along with Middle Eastern and Eastern European in this collection of recipes from more than 16 countries—some of them from Jewish communities, others kosher without trying, and still others adapted (e.g., veal instead of pork chops with Alsatian mustard sauce and noodles; ground turkey instead of pork in Chinese stuffed mushrooms) by the chef-teachers at N.Y.C.'s 92nd Street Y Kosher Cooking School. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1992

"God-fearers), but his study reinforces the perception that his subjects live in a simply perceived world of theological givens."
An ethnographer's safari into the black-and-white world of Ultra-Orthodox Jews. Read full book review >
PATRICK'S CORNER by Sean Patrick
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1992

"A nostalgic tribute from the baby of a family—life-affirming, if disappointingly prosaic."
Patrick, a Catholic Digest columnist, offers sentimental reminiscences of growing up Irish and poor in post-WW II America—a tale of shamrocks and hastily muttered Gaelic prayers that never moves beneath the surface. ``Patrick's Corner'' is what Sean and his five older brothers called the intersection in Cleveland where each in turn sold newspapers and performed ten-cent shoeshines for pocket money and to help their widowed mother keep a roof over their heads. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Gabrielle Zevin
March 3, 2015

A. J. Fikry’s life is not at all what he expected it to be. He lives alone, his bookstore is experiencing the worst sales in its history, and now his prized possession, a rare collection of Poe poems, has been stolen. But when a mysterious package appears at the bookstore, its unexpected arrival gives Fikry the chance to make his life over—and see everything anew. “Zevin writes characters who grow and prosper,” our reviewer writes, “in a narrative that is sometimes sentimental, sometimes funny, sometimes true to life and always entertaining.” View video >