Religion Book Reviews (page 178)

RASTAFARI by Barry Chevannes
RELIGION
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"Scholarly and cautious about making factual claims without sufficient data, Chevannes is also unabashedly sympathetic to the Rastafari."
Chevannes (Sociology/Univ. of the West Indies, Jamaica) uses oral history, interviews, and a good deal of historical interpretation and synthesis to present a history of Rastafarianism, the Jamaican-based pan-African movement. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"A significant, lucid presentation of a little-known slice of Jewish history, the history of science, and the history of racism. (11 illustrations, not seen)"
A thorough and fascinating study of how 19th-century gentile and Jewish scientists worked to find a scientific understanding of race and of how that labor affected their views of Jews. Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"Important ground traversed better by other scholars, notably Delores Williams in Sisters in the Wilderness (not reviewed)."
A provocative but opaque feminist examination of the figure of Jesus that adds more heat than light to current theological debates. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"Still, despite its tantalizing brevity, an elegant book."
In three essays based on lectures, Lewis provides an engaging overview of the cultural and political clash between Christian Europe and the Islamic world from the late 15th to the early 19th centuries. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 16, 1994

"A pathbreaking, superb contribution to Holocaust studies."
Bauer offers an eye-opening look into the following question: Could Jewish leaders in America, England, Palestine, and occupied Europe itself have ransomed significant numbers of their brethren? Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: Nov. 10, 1994

"But this memoir is sad too for what it reveals about the author, who seems largely unable to winnow out much of substance from a great deal of oral fluff."
Sometimes a memoir writer makes the unfortunate decision to turn a potentially good 20-page article into a work many times that length. Read full book review >
THE FATHER by Alfred Habegger
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"This deserves an honored place on the shelves with previous biographies of the James family by Leon Edel, R.W.B. Lewis, and Jean Strouse."
Can a minor literary figure sustain interest throughout a major biography? Read full book review >
A TREMOR OF BLISS by Paul Elie
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Valuable for inspiration, but also for information—the details of the lives and deaths of many saints are here, refracted through 20 idiosyncratic, often powerful points of view."
Lambent prose and a general lack of self-indulgence characterize these essays on the Catholic canon of saints. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Despite occasional redundancies—only natural given the 400 pages of commentary on a brief text—this book is absorbing and provocative."
A generally superb collection of both traditional and unorthodox readings of the Book of Ruth. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Scholarly, carefully reasoned, and lucidly written, Meier's portrait of Jesus as a fiery, wonder-working prophet rather than the gentle teacher of Christian tradition may continue the controversy (with believers and nonbelievers alike) initiated in Volume One."
This second volume of Meier's magisterial attempt to create a ``consensus document'' about the historical Jesus on which scholars of all faiths could agree makes some tantalizing assertions about Jesus' public ministry. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"This analysis of an important American educational story is somewhat plodding and dry, but the end result is coherent and insightful."
An authoritative study of the emergence of Jewish studies on the American campus. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Full of sound and fury, signifying very little."
An unfocused harangue that leaves the reader feeling as little sympathy for the author as for the traditional Jewish institution she attacks: the separation of men and women during prayer. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Morgan Matson
July 25, 2016

The Unexpected Everything is a YA feel-good story of friendship, finding yourself, and all the joys in life that happen while you’re busy making other plans. Andie has a plan. And she always sticks to her plan. Future? A top-tier medical school. Dad? Avoid him as much as possible (which isn’t that hard considering he’s a Congressman and he’s never around). Friends? Palmer, Bri, and Toby—pretty much the most awesome people on the planet, who needs anyone else? Relationships? No one’s worth more than three weeks. So it’s no surprise that Andie’s got her summer all planned out too. Until a political scandal costs Andie her summer pre-med internship, and lands both she and Dad back in the same house together for the first time in years. Suddenly she’s doing things that aren’t Andie at all. “Romance fans will find plenty to enjoy, as Andie gradually lets down her guard and risks the messy and unpredictable wonder of first love,” our reviewer writes. “A novel best read on a lazy summer day with sand between the toes.” View video >