Religion Book Reviews (page 178)

HISTORY
Released: Oct. 2, 1995

"Daniels's account is a serious contribution to Puritan scholarship, serving to recharacterize our Puritan fathers in their full human dimensions."
Challenging the enduring legacy of Puritans as dour and joyless disciples of a fastidious religious life, the author remakes the Puritan past, showing them as they so often were: at prayer and at play. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Forget the historical theory: This is a profile in courage, the story of how a women with ingenuity, determination, and faith in God and herself survivedand eventually prospered. (9 b&w photos, not seen)"
A moving memoir of an unusual Jewish immigrant experience: homesteading in North Dakota around the turn of the century. Read full book review >

STREETS by Bella Spewack
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"A study in personal determination, but lacking the literary touches that allow us to see and experience a life. (10 b&w photos, not seen)"
A vitriolic look back at a childhood of poverty by an Eastern European immigrant at the start of the 20th century. Read full book review >
THE RECOLLECTED HEART by Philip Zaleski
RELIGION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Although clearly intended for an audience that is either devoutly Christian or seeking religion, this book can serve as a lesson to all on the importance of quiet time for meditation and contemplation."
Zaleski, a professor of religion and literature (Smith Coll. and Wesleyan Univ.) and longtime contributor to Kirkus, provides a detailed guide to spiritual retreat. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Deloria should have stuck to his fundamentalist guns; his attempt to fight science with science is a dismal failure."
The first of a proposed trilogy attacking Western science, religion, and government. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"If only Eisenberg had followed his advice."
More of a quickie tour than genuine travels among the world's most distinctiveand most religiously extremeJews. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Uplifting, if somewhat unorthodox."
A novelist, feminist, and amateur theologian provides both food for thought and a more user-friendly deity for disaffected Christians. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"But cyberspace gets a thumbs-up, and a guide to electronic spiritual resources is included."
James Joyce had the epiphany. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Often funny and irreverent, Wilson makes theology personal and readable while bravely pushing the limits of religion and sexuality."
Wilson, senior pastor of the Metropolitan Community Church (MCC) of Los Angeles, takes the Bible back from fundamentalists and the Christian right and gives her own interpretation of the text that embraces queer believers. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 20, 1995

"A very Irish view of Europe and Catholicism, likely to appeal to those whose inner search also takes them beyond themselves."
An Irish novelist (The Heather Blazing, 1993, etc.) and journalist reports on his visits to centers of Catholic devotion in Europe, as he attempts to make sense of his own conflicted relationship with the faith he has abandoned. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Sept. 15, 1995

"In the end, the reader learns more here about the spirit of Arthur Waskow than of authentic Jewish beliefs."
A sincere but overly idiosyncratic guide for those who are disenchanted with more traditional Judaism. Read full book review >
HANDBOOK FOR THE SOUL by Richard Carlson
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 11, 1995

"Popularized, feel-good wisdom, presented as a bromide instead of an incentive to more serious seeking."
Brief inspirational essays from 30 popular gurus, presented by West Coast therapists Carlson and Shield. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >