Religion Book Reviews (page 178)

HISTORY
Released: March 20, 1995

"Those most likely to benefit from this excursion in self-help might be those who recognize it as raw material for satire."
The road less traveled has by now become the beaten path, and Schwartz—reporting a recent and exhaustive spiritual trek—doesn't leave discernible footprints on it. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 15, 1995

"Superficial treatment of a significant religious and psychological theme."
Accounts of dreams, waking visions, and near-death experiences featuring the figure of Jesus, with a running commentary by psychotherapist Sparrow. Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"Demanding but stimulating fare for those who believe that human events are ultimately responses to ideas and attitudes."
The director of the Florilogia Institute in Sonoma, Calif., uses literature, current events, and the Bible to argue that the efficacy of ritual violence in human affairs has been undermined by the Judaeo-Christian concern for the victim. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"Brilliant writing in the service of a disappointingly dogmatic positivism."
Controversial biblical scholar Crossan restates his thesis that the Gospel accounts of the death of Jesus tell us more about the polemics of the early Christians than about what really happened. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"Thankfully, Ferguson quotes liberally from well-informed and articulate critics of Israeli society, but this journal indicates that she has yet to join their ranks."
A slight and strident autobiographical account of an American academic's four-month stay on an Israeli kibbutz in 1992. Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"Best suited to a women's study group or Sunday school setting, the volume may be used as well for personal daily devotions."
A good, but less than earthshaking, discussion of biblical women, designed for study, reflection, and inspiration. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"Though the foregone conclusion of this tale precludes high drama, interested readers will find much here to think about."
McClory (The Man Who Beat Clout City, 1977) offers some prime details on a story that continues to reverberate through world Catholicism. Read full book review >
ASSIMILATION AND ITS DISCONTENTS by Barry Rubin
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"A first—but woefully incomplete—stab at understanding the main threat to Jewish continuity in the 21st century."
A reasoned but too narrowly argued historical brief against Jewish assimilation into Western culture. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1995

"Worthy stuff, but more detail than most readers will want."
A thorough, textured analysis of the sources and strategies of Martin Luther King's preaching and rhetoric. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 1995

"He coats standard, trickle-down mysticism with pseudo-scientific terms, hoping to make it easier for Western skeptics to swallow."
One scientist's hopeful meditations on the possibility of a consciousness beyond death. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1995

"A fascinating and well-written account."
An intelligent history of how Americans have tended to see the world as the battleground between absolute good and absolute evil. Read full book review >
AN ETHIC FOR ENEMIES by Jr. Shriver
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 1995

"For anyone concerned with the continual cycles of vengeance and retaliation in our world, Shriver's book offers a well-argued vision of hope."
A compelling case for forgiveness—traditionally thought of as the way to heal disputes between persons—as the route to better relations between peoples. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jeff Chang
September 20, 2016

In the provocative essays in journalist Jeff Chang’s new book We Gon’ Be Alright, Chang takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, personal writing, and cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism. Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. “He implores readers to listen, act, and become involved with today’s activists, who offer ‘new ways to see our past and our present,’ ” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.” View video >