Religion Book Reviews (page 179)

THE HISTORICAL FIGURE OF JESUS by E.P. Sanders
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Highly readable, this book will be of interest to scholars and accessible to general readers as well. (History Book Club main selection; Book-of-the-Month Club/Quality Paperback Book Club alternate selections)"
A valuable contribution to the evaluation of our knowledge about Jesus by a noted bible scholar. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Quite readable on the academic scale, but does not push any of the thematic buttons that would indicate a potential for crossing over into a mass market audience."
This mature ethnography of the rural east Indian village of Bisipara in the 1950s captures the spirit of life in a small community isolated from the outside world. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"For all its interdisciplinary breadth and originality, this reads like a beery breeze-shooting session with a college prof. (16 pages of b&w drawings, maps, not seen) (Author tour)"
In the latest leg of an idiosyncratic intellectual journey, Pellegrino looks at the stories of the Old Testament through the lenses of genetics, paleontology, and archaeology. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"It is the account of a group of people determined to make a difference—and of those who made a difference to them."
A poignant, heartfelt account of caring for children dying of AIDS. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 9, 1994

"Vivid, lighthearted, and unself-consciously profound."
An affectionate glimpse at the worlds of Japan and Zen. Read full book review >

HARD TRAVEL TO SACRED PLACES by Rudolph Wurlitzer
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 5, 1994

"Go elsewhere for all four."
A Southeast Asia travelogue that looks for spiritual sustenance but instead finds distraction in spiritual tourism and lengthy quotation. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"A rewarding anthology by women who take the Bible seriously and on its own terms, as a literary, ethical, and spiritual expression."
A group of really smart women give astute readings of the Bible that, for the most part, subscribe to neither religious nor feminist orthodoxies. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"This is an object lesson in what can happen when a versatile scholar draws on the tools of critical theory too much and reflects on the actual texts—and their authors' premodern contexts—too little."
A ``distant'' (as opposed to ``close'') reading of the Hebrew Bible via a largely unfocused use of gender and other modern and postmodern analytical categories. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

A strange work of travel writing that might well have been entitled International Investment and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"A lovingly wrought—but overly lengthy—bit of arcane religious history. (b&w illustrations)"
A scrupulous dissection of the daily lives of a group of cloistered 17th-century Franciscan nuns as seen through the eyes of one blighted sister in their midst. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: July 29, 1994

"Compelling and well presented, this volume deserves to be read by anyone concerned with Christian or political extremism in America."
A fascinating and terrifying account that is at once a work of academic scholarship and a startling exposÇ of a particularly virulent form of religious extremism. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: July 18, 1994

"Purple prose, flowery extended metaphors, and an obvious nostalgic longing for the 1960s mar what aspires to be an important study."
An alternately serious and silly look at the 60s as an era of spiritual change in the United States. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >