Religion Book Reviews (page 179)

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 25, 1993

"An assertive, odd, reductive reading of a familiar and complex cultural phenomenon that the Greeks identified as eros and thanatos."
A vivid but quirky survey of what Osborne (Paris Dreambook, 1991; Ania Malina, 1987) calls ``sexual pessimism''—the association between sexual pleasure and death—which he traces to the Gnostics, the pre-Christian sect that gave creative power to evil and held carnal pleasure in contempt. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 15, 1993

"A generally—and ironically—self-centered exercise in the economics of meaning, whose appeal seems limited largely to true believers."
A down-east entrepreneur's slick and assured account of how he brought his company into the light, thereby showing the way for less advanced enterprises. Read full book review >

PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Oct. 15, 1993

"It will hit the fast track fast, and keep on running and running and running."
Megawriter Peck, whose The Road Less Traveled continues as a smash bestseller more than a decade after publication, weighs in with additional down-to-earth counsel on psychological and religious matters, based this time on his talks and lectures. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Oct. 6, 1993

"Magisterial and brilliant."
Superb kaleidoscopic history of religion, from an English nun- turned-scholar. Read full book review >
HOW TO HANDLE TROUBLE by John Carmody
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Reliable counsel for sufferers everywhere."
Veteran author Carmody (Religion/University of Tulsa; Contemporary Catholic Theology, 1980, etc.) delivers a soft- spoken primer on how to deal with times of crisis. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Not for the casual reader, but a gold mine for history students and those interested in the Puritan origins of the US."
The impact of the Bible on England's experiment as a republic, charted expertly by one of the leading historians of the period. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"This is altogether more subjective, simplifying, and, finally, unconvincing."
Tilby, who produced a series called Soul for the BBC (to be seen in the US on the Learning Channel), here uses her findings from that program as the basis for a personal odyssey through the sometimes conflicting claims of Christianity and science. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

Physician Dossey (Medicine and Meaning, 1991, etc.) continues to probe links between medicine and spirituality in this popular study of the healing power of prayer. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A disturbing report—and especially timely, with American bishops taking a higher profile to counteract abuse. (Photos—not seen)"
A hard-hitting investigation of what the authors term ``the greatest public relations fiasco the Catholic Church has faced in recent memory''—the recent explosion of pedophilia trials and lawsuits involving Catholic clergy. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A lively, definitive, and thoughtful account of a clan whose star has waxed as that of its Rothschild rivals has waned."
From the National Book Award-winning author of The House of Morgan (1990): an engrossing history of the Hamburg banking family that explores the love/hate relationship between Germany and its native-born Jews with as much interest as it recounts the lives of those who made Warburg a name to be reckoned with on both sides of the Atlantic. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 25, 1993

"Engaging, but of interest and appeal mainly to disaffected Catholics."
Well-told if slanted journalistic account of Catholicism, by a columnist for the National Catholic Reporter. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 15, 1993

"Sure to provoke much acclamation and dissent."
An important broadside attack on, as Carter (Law/Yale; Reflections of an Affirmative Action Baby, 1991) puts it, the ``effort to banish religion for politic's sake.'' In this passionately argued polemic—which Carter, a black Episcopalian, backs with personal anecdote, historical research, and legal brief—the case is made that something has gone awry in American politics since the heyday of the civil-rights struggle. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >