Religion Book Reviews (page 179)

THE VALKYRIES by Paulo Coelho
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"More pap for the spiritually challenged."
A facile New Age story in which the author and his wife are initiated into the cult of angels by a band of women bikers in the Mojave Desert. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Goldberg's erudite passion deserves the ear of the masses."
An eloquent, brave call to Jewish covenantal fidelitybut a jeremiad that may go as unheeded as that of the prophet himself. Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"An accessible, attractive guide for the returning Jew."
Rabbi Gordis (Univ. of Judaism) leads us through the main areas of Jewish life, rebutting the charge that Judaism does not offer a spiritual path and suggesting answers to the question, Why be Jewish? Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"A journey along the edge of human comprehension: accessible and even elegant, but a bit overstuffed."
A New York Times science writer contemplates the human compulsion to search for order and purpose in the origin of the universe and the development of life on earth. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Ultimately unconvincing. (Author tour)"
Ordained minister Murray and writer-scholar Ross (Compassionate Capitalism, not reviewed) look back on the circumstances of the Supreme Court decision to abolish school prayer and advocate its reinstitution. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"While spiritual seekers may find more questions raised than answered, this book lays down the framework of a consistent moral vision. (Author tour)"
A blueprint for living an ethical and meaningful life, based on the teachings of the late leader of the Lubavitch movement of Hassidic Jewry. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Provocative and challenging, the questions raised here deserve to be answered as the ashes from Waco and Oklahoma City still settle."
A thoroughly absorbing though not entirely credible analysis of the Branch Davidian movement and critique of America's stance toward ``cults.'' Both specialists in religion, Tabor (Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte) and Gallagher (Connecticut College) convincingly contend that the tragedy at Waco, Tex., that resulted in the deaths of 4 federal agents and 80 Branch Davidians could easily have been averted. Read full book review >
KONIN by Theo Richmond
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 28, 1995

"This marvelous book revives, just in time, a way of life that, when another generation has passed, will be truly irretrievable. (32 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A stunning recreation of a lost time and placethe Polish shtetl, or village, where Richmond's parents were born, and whose Jewish population was destroyed in the Holocaust. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Aug. 4, 1995

"Purely arbitrary interpretations that, when all's said and done, just don't fly."
A bizarre attempt by a legal historian to show that St. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 2, 1995

"An extraordinary glimpse into a rich and meaningful mythology. (15 line drawings)"
Through soothing rhythms and repetition, Johnston recreates the ancient storytelling tradition of the Ojibway Indians. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"But while her basic premise on physics as theology overstates the case, Wertheim's text has other merits: She brings to light fascinating details of the lives and times of many exceptional women and men who have helped shape our current worldview."
Are physicists a priesthood excluding women on age-old grounds that women can't be ``ordained''? Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Well argued and astute, this critical work makes an exciting contribution to contemporary scientific and cultural debate."
In a brilliantly controversial polemic, Johnson (Law/Univ. of Calif., Berkeley) fires an intellectual broadside against what he sees as the marginalization of theism in public life and explores its implications for society and religion. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >