Religion Book Reviews (page 179)

JESUITS by Jean Lacouture
RELIGION
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

"Jesuit studies. (16 pages b&w photos)"
A tour de force narrative history that provides readers with detailed and engrossing biographies of several notable Jesuits. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

"Although the central argument of the book remains unproven, this is an enlightening and entertaining look at a relatively undiscussed aspect of American culture, particularly interesting for its insights into 19th-century mores."
Schmidt (Religion/Drew Univ.; Holy Fairs, not reviewed) traces the cultural and commercial history of American holidays with some surprising results. Read full book review >

JOURNEY TO MY FATHER, ISAAC BASHEVIS SINGER by Israel Zamir
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

"Must reading for fans of the master Yiddishist. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A revealing profile of the Nobel laureate in literature by his son and only child. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

"Brilliantly cynical presentation of an unpopular but still influential religious outlook."
A provocative critique of the Jansenist movement and of its celebrated proponent Blaise Pascal, from internationally renowned scholar Kolakowski (The Alienation of Reason, 1968, etc.; Committee on Social Thought/Univ. of Chicago). Read full book review >
AUSCHWITZ by Lucie Adelsberger
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 30, 1995

"It is a notable addition to the list of testimonies available in English about that darkest period of human history. (illustrations, not seen)"
A taut, terse Holocaust narrative that is all the more powerful for its ironic reserve. Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: Oct. 11, 1995

"Still, an often insightful look at the eternal nature of human experience. (Book-of-the-Month Club/Quality Paperback Book Club/Jewish Book Club selections; author tour)"
Psychotherapist and Bible teacher Rosenblatt's first book is a well-meshed combination of her chosen fields: It's a self-help reading of the book of Genesis. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 2, 1995

"A nontheological approach to a profoundly theological question that is both exciting and inevitably limited."
Friedman (Hebrew and Comp. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 2, 1995

"Daniels's account is a serious contribution to Puritan scholarship, serving to recharacterize our Puritan fathers in their full human dimensions."
Challenging the enduring legacy of Puritans as dour and joyless disciples of a fastidious religious life, the author remakes the Puritan past, showing them as they so often were: at prayer and at play. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Forget the historical theory: This is a profile in courage, the story of how a women with ingenuity, determination, and faith in God and herself survivedand eventually prospered. (9 b&w photos, not seen)"
A moving memoir of an unusual Jewish immigrant experience: homesteading in North Dakota around the turn of the century. Read full book review >
STREETS by Bella Spewack
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"A study in personal determination, but lacking the literary touches that allow us to see and experience a life. (10 b&w photos, not seen)"
A vitriolic look back at a childhood of poverty by an Eastern European immigrant at the start of the 20th century. Read full book review >
THE RECOLLECTED HEART by Philip Zaleski
RELIGION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Although clearly intended for an audience that is either devoutly Christian or seeking religion, this book can serve as a lesson to all on the importance of quiet time for meditation and contemplation."
Zaleski, a professor of religion and literature (Smith Coll. and Wesleyan Univ.) and longtime contributor to Kirkus, provides a detailed guide to spiritual retreat. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Deloria should have stuck to his fundamentalist guns; his attempt to fight science with science is a dismal failure."
The first of a proposed trilogy attacking Western science, religion, and government. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >