Religion Book Reviews (page 2)

HOLY LANDS by Nicolas Pelham
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 12, 2016

"A lively, succinct, nonpolemical study that will offer much thought for discussion."
A sound, accessible argument for why returning to the mixed-faith communities living among each other in the Ottoman model might just save the Middle East. Read full book review >
A JEWISH GUIDE IN THE HOLY LAND by Jackie Feldman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 10, 2016

"An odd book but nonetheless a unique lens through which to view the conflicted Promised Land."
An Israeli tour guide considers the complicated methods, both academic and personal, of performing for Christian pilgrims. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A somewhat superficial but illuminating journey in search of community and social justice."
An unbeliever embarks on an ambitious personal journey to sample the top four world religions, emerging more connected and less anxious. Read full book review >
TILL WE HAVE BUILT JERUSALEM by Adina Hoffman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"Lovers of Jerusalem will feel right at home as Hoffman brings a small bit of its history to life."
Hoffman (My Happiness Bears No Relation to Happiness: A Poet's Life in the Palestinian Century, 2009, etc.) studies three very different architects responsible for the look of Jerusalem.Read full book review >
FULL MOON OVER NOAH’S ARK by Rick Antonson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A book filled with the enthusiasm of discovery, the delight in accomplishment, and the relief of return."
A veteran travel writer pursues an interest from childhood: Noah, the ark, and the landing. Read full book review >

BECOMING WISE by Krista Tippett
HISTORY
Released: April 5, 2016

"A hopeful consideration of the human potential for enlightenment."
Five key words serve as guideposts in a search for wisdom. Read full book review >
SETTING THE WORLD ON FIRE by Shelley Emling
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A worthwhile read, but expect nothing new on this saint."
A biography of St. Catherine of Siena (1347-1380). Read full book review >
How I Found Myself in Egypt by Subhanah Wahhaj
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 3, 2016

"A thought-provoking read, especially for those with a limited knowledge of Islam.

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A Muslim woman discusses the challenges of her faith, and her spiritual awakening, in this debut memoir. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 1, 2016

"An astute study that should provoke productive conversations."
An exploration of the changing motivation behind American Jewish foreign policy and humanitarianism. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 1, 2016

"Though a balanced, objective study of the case would be useful and illuminating, Grumet does provide a readable look at the nitty-gritty of New York's political machine."
Post-mortem of an unusual Supreme Court case regarding the separation of church and state. Read full book review >
WHY BE JEWISH? by Edgar M. Bronfman
RELIGION
Released: March 22, 2016

"One man's personal call to laggard Jews to study, learn, and seek justice in a broken world. Readers of other persuasions may also profit from his insight into bits of Jewish thought and practice."
The late businessman and philanthropist answers his title's question with a last testament of sorts. Read full book review >
IN SEARCH OF BUDDHA'S DAUGHTERS by Christine Toomey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 22, 2016

"An inspiring and necessary addition to the body of work about modern-day Buddhism."
A British journalist's account of her yearlong investigation into the lives and motivations of women who chose to become Buddhist nuns. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >