Religion Book Reviews (page 2)

Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"While Thavis makes no attempt to verify or disprove the authenticity of the phenomena he covers, his book is an engaging introduction to the subject for lay readers—though it may prove dull for those expecting the drama of The Da Vinci Code."
From angelic apparitions to demonic possessions, the realm of the supernatural makes its presence felt in Catholic communities around the world—but the Vatican often maintains a certain distance. Read full book review >
Faith, Doubt, Mystery by James J. Tracy
Released: Sept. 3, 2015

"A sympathetic but unflinchingly honest testament of indoctrination and embattled faith."
An affecting account of one man's experiences with the Catholic faith. Read full book review >

Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"An incisive sociological lens on a religion in flux, which, though centuries distant, continues to hold relevance for the present day."
How evangelical missionaries, dispatched from New England to the Ottoman Empire in the early 19th century, failed spectacularly to convert the Muslim masses but had a lasting impact on the face of American Christianity. Read full book review >
POPE FRANCIS by Paul Vallely
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Discovering a pope with a controversial past and a revolutionary style of leadership in the present, Vallely provides a highly worthwhile resource for Catholics and non-Catholics alike."
An exhaustive look at the newest pope. Read full book review >
THE GRAMMAR OF GOD by Aviya Kushner
Released: Aug. 18, 2015

"A paean, in a way, to the rigors and frustrations—and ultimate joys—of trying to comprehend the unfathomable."
A freelancer debuts with a memoir/disquisition about the Hebrew Bible and the difficulties—linguistic and personal—that translators into English have faced. Read full book review >

How and Why God Evolved by Babar Shah Khan
Released: Aug. 13, 2015

"A bracing, comprehensive deconstruction."
A clinical assessment of the human origins of organized religion. Read full book review >
WHY I AM A SALAFI by Michael Muhammad Knight
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"A vigorous treatment of how the sacred, in all its multifarious forms, continues to exercise power, even if sometimes it just feels like 'we're arguing over what the mystery god intended to say in his address to a mystic in a cave some fifteen centuries ago.'"
Knight (Tripping with Allah: Islam, Drugs, and Writing, 2013, etc.) traverses the scenic highways of Islamic history, seeking paths that connect him to Muhammad. Read full book review >
Released: June 22, 2015

"A surprisingly winning long-distance love story."
The story of a Christian relationship, revealed in a series of letters. Read full book review >
Maimonides & Metabolism by Rabbi Yonason Herschlag
Released: June 12, 2015

"Readers looking to understand all the factors in weight-loss management will find this a good supplement to material produced by experts."
A reconsideration of the physiology of weight loss, supported by the writings of the Jewish philosopher Maimonides. Read full book review >
Released: May 19, 2015

"Deeply religious readers may not even pick it up, but this is an important book that deserves an open-minded readership."
A scientist assails superstition and irrationality. Read full book review >
Living Fulfilled... by Lisa Thomas-McMillan
Released: May 11, 2015

"A somewhat scattered but ultimately heartwarming story of fighting for justice."
This debut memoir about Thomas-McMillan's campaigns to raise awareness of hunger and abolish the death penalty also serves as a practical guide to volunteerism. Read full book review >
The Devil's Way by Lamees A.
Released: May 6, 2015

"A protracted, argument-starting debate between the Devil and an advocate for humanity."
A dramatized dialogue on the nature of good and evil, conducted between a young man and the devil himself. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >