Religion Book Reviews (page 2)

Released: Aug. 31, 2015

"A heartfelt but narrow prescription for finding a partner and creating a loving heterosexual marriage."
A Christianity-based approach to relationships driven by positive thinking, based on the authors' own courtship and marriage. Read full book review >
Growing Old With Grace by Ramakrishna Michaels
Released: Aug. 31, 2015

"Affecting; seasoned with intellectual maturity as well as spiritual passion."
A chronicle of a life spent at the intersections of Eastern and Western thought. Read full book review >

FAITH ED by Linda K. Wertheimer
Released: Aug. 18, 2015

"A worthwhile study marred by bias."
Narrow examination of the teaching of religion in America's public schools. Read full book review >
THE GRAMMAR OF GOD by Aviya Kushner
Released: Aug. 18, 2015

"A paean, in a way, to the rigors and frustrations—and ultimate joys—of trying to comprehend the unfathomable."
A freelancer debuts with a memoir/disquisition about the Hebrew Bible and the difficulties—linguistic and personal—that translators into English have faced. Read full book review >
WHY I AM A SALAFI by Michael Muhammad Knight
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"A vigorous treatment of how the sacred, in all its multifarious forms, continues to exercise power, even if sometimes it just feels like 'we're arguing over what the mystery god intended to say in his address to a mystic in a cave some fifteen centuries ago.'"
Knight (Tripping with Allah: Islam, Drugs, and Writing, 2013, etc.) traverses the scenic highways of Islamic history, seeking paths that connect him to Muhammad. Read full book review >

Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"An occasionally repetitive but compelling study."
An impassioned investigative report tracing a deeply religious theme to the spate of civil rights violence from the 1950s until today. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"In 2001, Eckstein self-published a fictionalized autobiography; here, Chafets furthers the rabbi's efforts to publicize and burnish his image."
Celebrating a controversial rabbi's life. Read full book review >
What the Enemy Thinks by Gail Picco
Released: July 30, 2015

"Overdrawn yet readable portrait of collective advocacy and friendship at work, spearheaded by a valiant, relatable protagonist."
Former women's shelter counselor Picco, in her debut, traces the intertwining business and personal lives of an altruistic media consultancy executive. Read full book review >
Released: July 28, 2015

"A tender story gently told."
A child's perspective on a family's ordeal. Read full book review >
Released: July 9, 2015

"A worthy read for anyone interested in the modern relevance of Christian teaching."
A bold defense of Christianity against its most ardent critics, the New Atheists. Read full book review >
Released: July 7, 2015

"An occasionally long-winded but intriguing glimpse at one of Christianity's great treasures."
An academic exposé on the famed cup of Christ. Read full book review >
Theological Times by James Farris
Released: July 1, 2015

"A thoughtful consideration of the way modern philosophy has influenced Christian theology."
A philosophical reflection on the author's engagement with modern theological scholarship. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >