Religion Book Reviews (page 2)

Released: Feb. 1, 2014

"Kertzer is unflinching and relentless in his exposure of the Vatican's shocking actions."
More deeply troubling revelations around Vatican collaboration with evil. Read full book review >
DARLING by Richard Rodriguez
Released: Oct. 7, 2013

"With compassion and profundity of vision, Rodriguez offers a compelling view of modern spirituality that is as multifaceted as it is provocative."
An acclaimed gay intellectual and journalist's musings on the state of and interrelationship among Christianity, Judaism and Islam in the post-9/11 digital age. Read full book review >

THE RAINBOROWES by Adrian Tinniswood
Released: Sept. 10, 2013

"An extraordinary glimpse into a pivotal epoch in Western history."
A marvelously rendered tale of how one extended family helped shape, and was shaped by, the England and New England of the 1600s. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 6, 2013

"A profound, moving treatise on finding God in gardening."
A soul-searching memoir and travelogue about finding God in the food produced by community agriculture. Read full book review >
ZEALOT by Reza Aslan
Released: July 16, 2013

"Why has Christianity taken hold and flourished? This book will give you the answers in the simplest, most straightforward, comprehensible manner."
A well-researched, readable biography of Jesus of Nazareth. Read full book review >

CREATION by Adam Rutherford
Released: June 13, 2013

"While it is unlikely that scientists will synthesize a human in the near future, genuinely amazing biology is in the works, and Rutherford delivers a fascinating overview."
The day is nearly here when scientists will create the first purely synthetic life. This prediction turns up regularly, but British science writer and Nature editor Rutherford insists that the time is ripe, and he makes his case with contagious enthusiasm. Read full book review >
Released: April 12, 2013

"A generally persuasive, impassioned book-length essay. While his conclusions (and language) sometimes grow repetitive, they nonetheless serve to underscore at every turn an incisive argument buttressed by millennia of evidence."
Historian and editor Cannadine (History/Princeton Univ.; Mellon, 2006, etc.) constructs a stirring critique of history that questions conventional approaches to narrating the human chronicle. Read full book review >
WHY PRIESTS? by Garry Wills
Released: Feb. 12, 2013

"A comprehensive, critical exploration of the origin and meaning of priesthood and a formidable volley lobbed at tradition."
Pulitzer Prize winner Wills (Verdi's Shakespeare, 2011, etc.), a venerable voice on church history, thought and practice, provides a stunning critique of the Roman Catholic priesthood. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 17, 2013

"A patient, wholly compelling investigation into a paranoid 'religion' and the faithful held in its sweaty grip."
A devastating history-cum-exposé of the Church of Scientology. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 24, 2012

"Such a large historical project could have easily descended into tedious and dry academia, but instead, all three volumes are briskly paced, well-researched and insightful. Aficionados of urban histories, in particular, will find much to enjoy."
This ambitious three-volume history, overseen by Moore (Judaic Studies and History/Univ. of Michigan; American Jewish Identity Politics, 2008, etc.), provides a lively, much-needed overview of the role that Jews have played in the history and success of the Big Apple, helping to transform it into "a city of promises, some fulfilled, some pending, some beckoning new generations." Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 11, 2012

"A brilliant exposition of the possibility of science and religion, each in its own way, contributing to a better world."
A leading Jewish theologian argues that both religious fundamentalists and neo-Darwinian atheists such as Richard Dawkins have it wrong when they contend that science and religious faith are incompatible. Read full book review >
Released: July 31, 2012

"A perfect read for the election season, though its appeal will endure."
An irreverent, honest look at life outside the mainstream Mormon Church. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >