Religion Book Reviews (page 3)

THE LOST BOOK OF MOSES by Chanan Tigay
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 22, 2016

"A work of broad appeal, for the history buff and mystery lover alike."
The search for the world's oldest biblical manuscript. Read full book review >
The Jesus Fractal by Elizabeth Frykberg
RELIGION
Released: March 22, 2016

"A refreshing, thought-provoking explication of the tricky Christian concept of the triune God."
Debut author Frykberg offers a new way of looking at the many aspects of Jesus. Read full book review >

Diary of a Broken Mind by Sean Michael Montgomery
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 21, 2016

"A tragic, yet unconvincing, account of the author's visionary gifts."
Montgomery (The Prophecies of the Apocalyptic Son, 2009) shares his autobiography and divine revelations in this spiritual work.Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 18, 2016

"An exceptional addition to the science/faith genre."
A debut book offers a faithful exploration of the creation story in light of the scientific age. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 15, 2016

"Witty and engaging, this book simultaneously celebrates and challenges spiritual traditions."
In this evenhanded book, Wexler (Boston Univ. School of Law; Tuttle in the Balance, 2015, etc.) chronicles his travels around the world in search of spiritual practices that threaten environmental stewardship.Read full book review >

THE CITIES THAT BUILT THE BIBLE by Robert R. Cargill
RELIGION
Released: March 15, 2016

"A solid concept led astray by the perceived need to entertain the masses, à la the History Channel."
A lighthearted exploration of the history of the Bible, as seen through cities key to its development. Read full book review >
You Can't Un-Ring the Bell by Shirley J. Gilbert
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 14, 2016

"A well-intentioned but meandering meditation on pain and healing."
A seasoned psychologist offers wisdom and experience about facing life's hardships in this compact self-help volume. Read full book review >
Thar She Blows by James Ragsdale
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 8, 2016

"A confounding account of the author's life in horse racing."
In this hybrid work of spiritualism, memoir, and nonfiction, debut author Ragsdale takes the reader through his history with the sport of horse racing, from his younger years sneaking away from jobs for a few hours at the track to his later ownership of multiple thoroughbreds. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"The traumatic and illuminating events suffered by a teenage girl who dared to say she was gay in a religious community that doesn't readily accept homosexuality."
A memoir of a lesbian Mormon who stood up for her rights. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2016

"Timely, authoritative, and immensely depressing."
A visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution's Doha Center examines the emergence, growth, and evolution of the Syrian jihad from 2011 to 2015. Read full book review >
WAY OF LOVE by Norman Wirzba
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 2016

"A thoughtful exposition on love and its reverberations throughout creation."
Taking "God is love" seriously. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 2016

"An intriguing new angle on the well-worn field of 'historical Jesus' studies."
Understanding the role of memory in the formation of the Christian Gospels. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >