Religion Book Reviews (page 3)

RHAPSODY IN SCHMALTZ by Michael Wex
FOOD & COOKING
Released: April 19, 2016

"Informative, merrily entertaining culinary and cultural history."
An enticing tour of Judaism's culinary past. Read full book review >
SIX MEMOS FROM THE LAST MILLENNIUM by Joseph Skibell
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 19, 2016

"A fresh look at an ancient source."
A deep dive into the mysteries of the Talmud. Read full book review >

HOLY LANDS by Nicolas Pelham
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 12, 2016

"A lively, succinct, nonpolemical study that will offer much thought for discussion."
A sound, accessible argument for why returning to the mixed-faith communities living among each other in the Ottoman model might just save the Middle East. Read full book review >
A JEWISH GUIDE IN THE HOLY LAND by Jackie Feldman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 10, 2016

"An odd book but nonetheless a unique lens through which to view the conflicted Promised Land."
An Israeli tour guide considers the complicated methods, both academic and personal, of performing for Christian pilgrims. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A somewhat superficial but illuminating journey in search of community and social justice."
An unbeliever embarks on an ambitious personal journey to sample the top four world religions, emerging more connected and less anxious. Read full book review >

TILL WE HAVE BUILT JERUSALEM by Adina Hoffman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"Lovers of Jerusalem will feel right at home as Hoffman brings a small bit of its history to life."
Hoffman (My Happiness Bears No Relation to Happiness: A Poet's Life in the Palestinian Century, 2009, etc.) studies three very different architects responsible for the look of Jerusalem.Read full book review >
FULL MOON OVER NOAH’S ARK by Rick Antonson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A book filled with the enthusiasm of discovery, the delight in accomplishment, and the relief of return."
A veteran travel writer pursues an interest from childhood: Noah, the ark, and the landing. Read full book review >
BECOMING WISE by Krista Tippett
HISTORY
Released: April 5, 2016

"A hopeful consideration of the human potential for enlightenment."
Five key words serve as guideposts in a search for wisdom. Read full book review >
SETTING THE WORLD ON FIRE by Shelley Emling
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A worthwhile read, but expect nothing new on this saint."
A biography of St. Catherine of Siena (1347-1380). Read full book review >
How I Found Myself in Egypt by Subhanah Wahhaj
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 3, 2016

"A thought-provoking read, especially for those with a limited knowledge of Islam.

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A Muslim woman discusses the challenges of her faith, and her spiritual awakening, in this debut memoir. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 1, 2016

"An astute study that should provoke productive conversations."
An exploration of the changing motivation behind American Jewish foreign policy and humanitarianism. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 1, 2016

"Though a balanced, objective study of the case would be useful and illuminating, Grumet does provide a readable look at the nitty-gritty of New York's political machine."
Post-mortem of an unusual Supreme Court case regarding the separation of church and state. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >