Religion Book Reviews (page 3)

Released: May 29, 2012

"Awesome scholarship to an admirable purpose."
A religious scholar's compendium of essential American texts. Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 28, 2012

"A frank, exhaustive, marvelously readable study."
A sharp, clear, deeply researched examination of the consistent application of the founding religious principles to American foreign policy, from the colonists' sense of a Protestant exceptionalism to President Barack Obama's "Good Niebuhr Policy." Read full book review >

Released: Jan. 4, 2012

"Both well written and researched—a valuable contribution to an ongoing discussion."
An expert on national security challenges stereotypes of Islamic militancy and the threat it poses. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 27, 2011

"A phenomenal blend of science and cultural history."
Hubble Fellow Adam Frank (Astrophysics/Univ. of Rochester) delves into the complex relationship between time and culture and concludes that culture and cosmology—even the Big Bang—are linked inextricably together. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 13, 2011

"Johnson's portrayal of her time as a nun is likely to be controversial; her memoir is exceptional."
Beautifully crafted memoir of one woman's experience in Mother Teresa's order, the Missionaries of Charity. Read full book review >

Released: Aug. 1, 2011

"A masterful exploration of one of America's most shameful secrets."
Award-winning journalist Weyermann (The Gang They Couldn't Catch: The Story of America's Greatest Modern-Day Bank Robbers—And How They Got Away With It, 1993) throws open the curtains on the deplorable actions of Warren Jeffs and his polygamous sect. Read full book review >
Released: July 18, 2011

"A full-color view of the spectrum of Islam, a religion too often regarded in black-and-white terms."
A Turkish journalist recounts the history and fluctuations of Islam with grace and style. Read full book review >
Released: July 5, 2011

"A bizarre and complicated history told with masterful control."
Thoroughly engrossing page-turner on the shape-shifting Church of Scientology and its despotic, possibly criminal hierarchy. Read full book review >
Released: July 1, 2011

"Boldly goes where many Amish chronicles fear to tread: the exodus of members seeking an unencumbered lifestyle."
An affecting memoir from a former Old Order Amish member who abandoned his structured family life for autonomy in the free world. Read full book review >
Released: June 14, 2011

"Exceptional reimagining of Islam."
Manji takes readers outside the boxes of "moderation" and "multi-culturalism" to boldly tackle the problems with modern Islam. Read full book review >
Released: June 1, 2011

"Exhilarating and profound food for the timeless soul."
Western Buddhist offers transcendent life instructions regarding time, space, peace and love. Read full book review >
THE CONVERT by Deborah Baker
Released: May 13, 2011

"An important, searing, highly readable and timely narrative."
A Pulitzer Prize finalist delves into the fascinating life and letters of a young Jewish woman who converted to radical Islam and moved from suburban New York to Pakistan. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >