Religion Book Reviews (page 3)

Released: Jan. 17, 2013

"A patient, wholly compelling investigation into a paranoid 'religion' and the faithful held in its sweaty grip."
A devastating history-cum-exposé of the Church of Scientology. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 24, 2012

"Such a large historical project could have easily descended into tedious and dry academia, but instead, all three volumes are briskly paced, well-researched and insightful. Aficionados of urban histories, in particular, will find much to enjoy."
This ambitious three-volume history, overseen by Moore (Judaic Studies and History/Univ. of Michigan; American Jewish Identity Politics, 2008, etc.), provides a lively, much-needed overview of the role that Jews have played in the history and success of the Big Apple, helping to transform it into "a city of promises, some fulfilled, some pending, some beckoning new generations." Read full book review >

Released: Sept. 11, 2012

"A brilliant exposition of the possibility of science and religion, each in its own way, contributing to a better world."
A leading Jewish theologian argues that both religious fundamentalists and neo-Darwinian atheists such as Richard Dawkins have it wrong when they contend that science and religious faith are incompatible. Read full book review >
Released: July 31, 2012

"A perfect read for the election season, though its appeal will endure."
An irreverent, honest look at life outside the mainstream Mormon Church. Read full book review >
Released: May 29, 2012

"Awesome scholarship to an admirable purpose."
A religious scholar's compendium of essential American texts. Read full book review >

Released: Feb. 28, 2012

"A frank, exhaustive, marvelously readable study."
A sharp, clear, deeply researched examination of the consistent application of the founding religious principles to American foreign policy, from the colonists' sense of a Protestant exceptionalism to President Barack Obama's "Good Niebuhr Policy." Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 4, 2012

"Both well written and researched—a valuable contribution to an ongoing discussion."
An expert on national security challenges stereotypes of Islamic militancy and the threat it poses. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 27, 2011

"A phenomenal blend of science and cultural history."
Hubble Fellow Adam Frank (Astrophysics/Univ. of Rochester) delves into the complex relationship between time and culture and concludes that culture and cosmology—even the Big Bang—are linked inextricably together. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 13, 2011

"Johnson's portrayal of her time as a nun is likely to be controversial; her memoir is exceptional."
Beautifully crafted memoir of one woman's experience in Mother Teresa's order, the Missionaries of Charity. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 1, 2011

"A masterful exploration of one of America's most shameful secrets."
Award-winning journalist Weyermann (The Gang They Couldn't Catch: The Story of America's Greatest Modern-Day Bank Robbers—And How They Got Away With It, 1993) throws open the curtains on the deplorable actions of Warren Jeffs and his polygamous sect. Read full book review >
Released: July 18, 2011

"A full-color view of the spectrum of Islam, a religion too often regarded in black-and-white terms."
A Turkish journalist recounts the history and fluctuations of Islam with grace and style. Read full book review >
Released: July 5, 2011

"A bizarre and complicated history told with masterful control."
Thoroughly engrossing page-turner on the shape-shifting Church of Scientology and its despotic, possibly criminal hierarchy. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >