Religion Book Reviews (page 4)

Sacred Prayers to God by Mick Pollitt
RELIGION
Released: March 30, 2016

"A prayer journal that lacks polish and an effective presentation."
Pollitt offers 500 prayers to God in this Christian volume. Read full book review >
WHY BE JEWISH? by Edgar M. Bronfman
RELIGION
Released: March 22, 2016

"One man's personal call to laggard Jews to study, learn, and seek justice in a broken world. Readers of other persuasions may also profit from his insight into bits of Jewish thought and practice."
The late businessman and philanthropist answers his title's question with a last testament of sorts. Read full book review >

IN SEARCH OF BUDDHA'S DAUGHTERS by Christine Toomey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 22, 2016

"An inspiring and necessary addition to the body of work about modern-day Buddhism."
A British journalist's account of her yearlong investigation into the lives and motivations of women who chose to become Buddhist nuns. Read full book review >
THE LOST BOOK OF MOSES by Chanan Tigay
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 22, 2016

"A work of broad appeal, for the history buff and mystery lover alike."
The search for the world's oldest biblical manuscript. Read full book review >
The Jesus Fractal by Elizabeth Frykberg
RELIGION
Released: March 22, 2016

"A refreshing, thought-provoking explication of the tricky Christian concept of the triune God."
Debut author Frykberg offers a new way of looking at the many aspects of Jesus. Read full book review >

Diary of a Broken Mind by Sean Michael Montgomery
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 21, 2016

"A tragic, yet unconvincing, account of the author's visionary gifts."
Montgomery (The Prophecies of the Apocalyptic Son, 2009) shares his autobiography and divine revelations in this spiritual work.Read full book review >
Finding Proof of Jesus by James L. Kearns
RELIGION
Released: March 19, 2016

"A rambling, disappointingly undisciplined religious argument."
An attempt to prove the existence of God with both experiential and scientific evidence. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 18, 2016

A debut book offers a faithful exploration of the Creation story in light of the scientific age. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 15, 2016

"Witty and engaging, this book simultaneously celebrates and challenges spiritual traditions."
In this evenhanded book, Wexler (Boston Univ. School of Law; Tuttle in the Balance, 2015, etc.) chronicles his travels around the world in search of spiritual practices that threaten environmental stewardship.Read full book review >
THE CITIES THAT BUILT THE BIBLE by Robert R. Cargill
RELIGION
Released: March 15, 2016

"A solid concept led astray by the perceived need to entertain the masses, à la the History Channel."
A lighthearted exploration of the history of the Bible, as seen through cities key to its development. Read full book review >
You Can't Un-Ring the Bell by Shirley J. Gilbert
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: March 14, 2016

"A well-intentioned but meandering meditation on pain and healing."
A seasoned psychologist offers wisdom and experience about facing life's hardships in this compact self-help volume. Read full book review >
Toward the Throne! by John Craig Shaw
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 11, 2016

"An exciting, colorful, if downright surreal tale based on the book of Revelation."
A novel explores the impact of the Christian apocalypse on a small group of survivors. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >