Religion Book Reviews (page 4)

ZIONISM by Milton Viorst
Released: May 31, 2016

"A well-written, balanced, and intriguing reference."
An examination of Zionism through its most influential proponents. Read full book review >
A Girl Named Mary by Mary Jo Nickum
Released: May 26, 2016

"A provocative, intelligently constructed historical exercise."
A fictional imagining of the childhood of Jesus' mother, Mary. Read full book review >

Released: May 24, 2016

"A thought-provoking re-examination of a misunderstood heroine of the Bible."
Shining the spotlight on Mary Magdalene. Read full book review >
Trust Without Borders by Pamela J. Alexander
Released: May 23, 2016

"A careful, heartfelt textual deconstruction of Psalm 37 that reassures its readers: 'He shall deliver them from the wicked, and save them, because they trust in him.'"
A nonfiction debut offers an exhaustive explication of one of the most famous psalms of the Bible. Read full book review >
Released: May 17, 2016

"An intellectual and provocative perspective challenging Christians and others to reconsider the confines of spiritual interconnection, harmony, and progressive inclusion in modern religion."
In the latest installment of the publisher's enterprising Queer Action/Queer Ideas series, queer Episcopal priest and political strategist Edman brings a fresh approach to the ongoing conundrum between the LGBTQ community and Christianity. Read full book review >

THE MONEY CULT by Chris Lehmann
Released: May 17, 2016

"Lehmann makes an important and timely point, which is that American religion has always been about money."
A lively study of how the prim Puritans of old, "tireless strivers after divine favor and sticklers for political order," became the mega-churchy materialists of today. Read full book review >
Revising Genesis by James Quatro
Released: May 13, 2016

"An accessible, but serious new contribution to biblical studies."
A debut volume delivers a provocative reconsideration of the book of Genesis in light of modern science. Read full book review >
BOY ERASED by Garrard Conley
Released: May 10, 2016

"An engaging memoir that will inevitably make readers long for a more equal future."
In a sharp and shocking debut memoir, Conley digs deep into the ex-gay therapy system. Read full book review >
THE LAST SUPPER by Klaus Wivel
Released: May 10, 2016

"A flawed yet urgent and passionate epistle to the West to see an ongoing disaster."
A Danish journalist takes perilous excursions in the Middle East to assess the plight of Christians and finds them in a grievous state. Read full book review >
Released: May 6, 2016

"A highly readable reminder to Christians about where their true priorities should lie."
A handbook for devout Christians invokes diverse pop-culture references. Read full book review >
The Man Nobody Knew by Garrett C. Whitworth
Released: May 6, 2016

"An engaging novel of a Jesus who's very much man as well as God."
A novelized synthesis of Jesus' story in the New Testament. Read full book review >
ONEIDA by Ellen Wayland-Smith
Released: May 3, 2016

"A smartly contextualized tale of 'the tension between radical social critique and unapologetic accommodation...between communal harmony and individual striving.'"
A study of the unlikely origins of one of America's most recognizable brands. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
H.W. Brands
October 11, 2016

As noted historian H.W. Brands reveals in his new book The General vs. the President: MacArthur and Truman at the Brink of Nuclear War, at the height of the Korean War, President Harry S. Truman committed a gaffe that sent shock waves around the world. When asked by a reporter about the possible use of atomic weapons in response to China's entry into the war, Truman replied testily, "The military commander in the field will have charge of the use of the weapons, as he always has." This suggested that General Douglas MacArthur, the willful, fearless, and highly decorated commander of the American and U.N. forces, had his finger on the nuclear trigger. A correction quickly followed, but the damage was done; two visions for America's path forward were clearly in opposition, and one man would have to make way. Truman was one of the most unpopular presidents in American history. General MacArthur, by contrast, was incredibly popular, as untouchable as any officer has ever been in America. The contest of wills between these two titanic characters unfolds against the turbulent backdrop of a faraway war and terrors conjured at home by Joseph McCarthy. “An exciting, well-written comparison study of two American leaders at loggerheads during the Korean War crisis,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >