Religion Book Reviews (page 4)

APOSTLE by Tom Bissell
Released: March 1, 2016

"A rich, contentious, and challenging book."
A deep dive into the heart of the New Testament, crossing continents and cross-referencing texts. Read full book review >
STRANGE GODS by Susan Jacoby
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Jacoby draws the first detailed maps of a terrain that has been very much in need of intelligent, careful cartography."
In a work blending culture, religion, history, biography, and a bit of memoir (with more than a soupcon of attitude), the author of The Great Agnostic: Robert Ingersoll and American Freethought (2013, etc.) returns with a revealing historical analysis of religious conversions.Read full book review >

The Journey of a Spiritual Traveler by Michael Kurtz
Released: Jan. 25, 2016

"A set of philosophical but accessible ruminations on Christian life."
A series of meditative essays on the joys and challenges of a spiritual life. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"An unsentimental yet wholly moving memoir."
A high school Spanish teacher's memoir about a peripatetic, often turbulent childhood and adolescence spent among fundamentalist Mormons. Read full book review >
Christ's 40 Commandments by Renee Valverde Wagenblatt
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"A crisp, lucid organizational tool kit for categorizing Jesus' teachings."
A debut collection of the moral and social precepts attributed to Jesus Christ in the Bible. Read full book review >

Hide and Watch by Jill Hicks Lawson
Released: Jan. 4, 2016

"An economically written testimony that will appeal to Christians seeking to reconcile their faith with loss."
A Christian testimony about a family that faced years of medical challenges. Read full book review >
Released: Dec. 13, 2015

"The verse sparkles and the visuals shine in this volume that examines Genesis."
A book offers a multimedia celebration of Jewish Scripture. Read full book review >
Meditation Moments by Victor Stobbe
Released: Dec. 9, 2015

"A worthy contribution to the afterlife of biblical poetry."
Debut author Stobbe gives modern readers a fresh look at the Psalms in this clever poetic experiment. Read full book review >
His by Jaye Wiegold
Released: Dec. 9, 2015

"A deeply religious meditation on how God's love gives meaning to a woman's life."
A woman explores how different principles of Christianity have enabled her to overcome adversity. Read full book review >
Released: Dec. 4, 2015

"A well-written, modern version of an ancient Chinese work."
Norup (Life Beyond Time Management, 1997), writing with his daughter Milbrath, offers an interpretation of the I Ching for middle-aged readers.Read full book review >
Released: Dec. 1, 2015

"An illuminating biography of 'an intelligent and thoughtful man.'"
The life and times of a Spanish monarch who invigorated cultural life. Read full book review >
BATTLING THE GODS by Tim Whitmarsh
Released: Nov. 13, 2015

"Though not for those seeking a light read, this is a seminal work on the subject, to be studied, reread, and referenced."
Whitmarsh (Greek Culture/Univ. of Cambridge; Beyond the Second Sophistic: Adventures in Greek Postclassicism, 2013, etc.) explores the evolution of atheism from Homer to the Roman Empire.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
H.W. Brands
October 11, 2016

As noted historian H.W. Brands reveals in his new book The General vs. the President: MacArthur and Truman at the Brink of Nuclear War, at the height of the Korean War, President Harry S. Truman committed a gaffe that sent shock waves around the world. When asked by a reporter about the possible use of atomic weapons in response to China's entry into the war, Truman replied testily, "The military commander in the field will have charge of the use of the weapons, as he always has." This suggested that General Douglas MacArthur, the willful, fearless, and highly decorated commander of the American and U.N. forces, had his finger on the nuclear trigger. A correction quickly followed, but the damage was done; two visions for America's path forward were clearly in opposition, and one man would have to make way. Truman was one of the most unpopular presidents in American history. General MacArthur, by contrast, was incredibly popular, as untouchable as any officer has ever been in America. The contest of wills between these two titanic characters unfolds against the turbulent backdrop of a faraway war and terrors conjured at home by Joseph McCarthy. “An exciting, well-written comparison study of two American leaders at loggerheads during the Korean War crisis,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >