Religion Book Reviews (page 4)

MALCOLM X by Manning Marable
Released: April 4, 2011

"A bold, sure-footed, significant biography of enormous depth and feeling."
A candid, corrective look at the Nation of Islam leader and renegade—and a deeply informed investigation of the evolution of his thinking on race and revolution. Read full book review >
Released: March 9, 2011

"Another winner from a skillful writer and thinker of the first rank."
A sound, deeply felt study of Jerusalem as the "cockpit of violence" for the three Abrahamic religions. Read full book review >

AN EXCLUSIVE LOVE by Johanna Adorján
Released: Jan. 10, 2011

"In the process of assimilating disparate facts into a poignant and elegant story, Adorján exposes her own hopes and fears, an added bonus."
Berlin-based journalist Adorján's debut examines why and how her grandparents committed suicide together, decades after they survived the Holocaust. Read full book review >
Released: Dec. 13, 2010

"Well-written and -documented, a supremely helpful guide in sorting out how we arrived at that odd state of affairs."
A lucid history of how California, land of fruits and nuts and be-here-nowness, became a bastion of fundamentalist reaction. The manuscript won the 2006 Allan Nevins Prize from the Society of American Historians. Read full book review >
THE BOY by Dan Porat
Released: Nov. 2, 2010

"A remarkable work and an essential document in the vast library devoted to the Shoah."
A moving scholarly detective story that hinges on an iconic photograph from the Holocaust. Read full book review >

Released: Oct. 19, 2010

"Not to be confused with the 1997 Richard Vetere novel of the same name, Briggs's book provides an equally entertaining story, with the added benefit of being true."
Intriguing glimpse into the Vatican saint-making process. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 12, 2010

"Learned, lively and shrewd."
Lepore (American History/Harvard Univ.;New York Burning: Liberty, Slavery, and Conspiracy in Eighteenth-Century Manhattan, 2005, etc.) explores the nexus of the American Revolution, the understanding and telling of history and today's Tea Party. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 5, 2010

"Humble, challenging and inspiring."
With the assistance of science journalist Olson (Mapping Human History: Discovering the Past Through Our Genes, 2002, etc.), Bad Religion leader Graffin presents a memoir of a life lived "at the intersection of evolutionary biology and punk rock." Read full book review >
TWO CENTS PLAIN by Martin Lemelman
Released: Sept. 5, 2010

"'Life is the biggest bargain. You get it for free,' reads one of the Yiddish sayings that introduce the chapters, in a book that is both a celebration and an affirmation of life."
Memory comes alive in this compelling amalgam of drawing, narrative and archival photography. Read full book review >
Released: May 1, 2010

"A stunning, riveting commentary."
In this sequel to the groundbreaking Terror and Liberalism (2003, etc.), political writer and New Republic contributing editor Berman analyzes the rise of the Islamist totalitarian movement and the Western media's troubling inability—or unwillingness—to identify and investigate its implications. Read full book review >
BONHOEFFER by Eric Metaxas
Released: April 20, 2010

"A definitive Bonhoeffer biography for the 21st century."
A welcome new biography of one of the 20th century's leading lights. Read full book review >
THE CASE FOR GOD by Karen Armstrong
Released: Sept. 25, 2009

"Accessible, intriguing study of how we see God."
Fascinating journey through Western civilization's ongoing attempts to understand and explain the concept of God. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Marie Lu
September 29, 2015

In the second installment of Marie Lu’s Young Elites series, The Rose Society, Adelina Amouteru’s heart has suffered at the hands of both family and friends, turning her down the bitter path of revenge. Now known and feared as the White Wolf, she and her sister flee Kenettra to find other Young Elites in the hopes of building her own army of allies. Her goal: to strike down the Inquisition Axis, the white-cloaked soldiers who nearly killed her. But Adelina is no heroine. Her powers, fed only by fear and hate, have started to grow beyond her control. She does not trust her newfound Elite friends. Teren Santoro, leader of the Inquisition, wants her dead. And her former friends, Raffaele and the Dagger Society, want to stop her thirst for vengeance. Adelina struggles to cling to the good within her. But how can someone be good, when her very existence depends on darkness? “The direction of this trilogy's conclusion is left refreshingly difficult to predict,” our reviewer writes. View video >