Religion Book Reviews (page 5)

THE SOUND OF GRAVEL by Ruth Wariner
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"An unsentimental yet wholly moving memoir."
A high school Spanish teacher's memoir about a peripatetic, often turbulent childhood and adolescence spent among fundamentalist Mormons. Read full book review >
Hide and Watch by Jill Hicks Lawson
RELIGION
Released: Jan. 4, 2016

"An economically written testimony that will appeal to Christians seeking to reconcile their faith with loss."
A Christian testimony about a family that faced years of medical challenges. Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: Dec. 17, 2015

"A vehement, lyrical restatement of biblical strictures, full of fire and brimstone."
This thunderous volume of Christian apologetics preaches New Testament dogma with Old Testament vigor. Read full book review >
Imperience by Erik Knud-Hansen
RELIGION
Released: Dec. 11, 2015

"A spiritually transporting, thought-provoking volume."
A far-reaching study explores pathways to awakening absolute consciousness. Read full book review >
Meditation Moments by Victor Stobbe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 9, 2015

"A worthy contribution to the afterlife of biblical poetry."
Debut author Stobbe gives modern readers a fresh look at the Psalms in this clever poetic experiment. Read full book review >

His by Jaye Wiegold
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 9, 2015

"A deeply religious meditation on how God's love gives meaning to a woman's life."
A woman explores how different principles of Christianity have enabled her to overcome adversity. Read full book review >
THE DAWNING MOON OF THE MIND by Susan Brind Morrow
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 8, 2015

"An erudite investigation that rewards patient, careful reading."
Ancient Egyptian philosophy revealed in a hieroglyphic text. Read full book review >
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Dec. 4, 2015

"A well-written, modern version of an ancient Chinese work."
Norup (Life Beyond Time Management, 1997), writing with his daughter Milbrath, offers an interpretation of the I Ching for middle-aged readers.Read full book review >
FIGHTING GOD by David Silverman
RELIGION
Released: Dec. 1, 2015

"Silverman's unrelentingly combative tone will likely only appeal to the choir."
An evangelical manifesto to recruit "closeted atheists" to become firebrand activists. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 1, 2015

"An illuminating biography of 'an intelligent and thoughtful man.'"
The life and times of a Spanish monarch who invigorated cultural life. Read full book review >
The Hidden Evils of the Biligramite Cult by Eric Demaree
RELIGION
Released: Nov. 29, 2015

"A forthright call for Christians to pursue a more private and personal relationship with God."
Demaree's nonfiction debut offers an exposé of what he sees as the personality cult surrounding American preacher Billy Graham. Read full book review >
DNA of Mathematics by Mehran Basti
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 25, 2015

"Despite occasional nuggets of intrigue, wildly uneven and simply too disorganized to hold much interest or credibility."
Debut author Basti, a mathematician, explains the wide-ranging significance of Riccati differential equations frequently used in studies of motion in physics and engineering. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >