Religion Book Reviews (page 5)

FAITH ED by Linda K. Wertheimer
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 18, 2015

"A worthwhile study marred by bias."
Narrow examination of the teaching of religion in America's public schools. Read full book review >
THE GRAMMAR OF GOD by Aviya Kushner
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 18, 2015

"A paean, in a way, to the rigors and frustrations—and ultimate joys—of trying to comprehend the unfathomable."
A freelancer debuts with a memoir/disquisition about the Hebrew Bible and the difficulties—linguistic and personal—that translators into English have faced. Read full book review >

How and Why God Evolved by Babar Shah Khan
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 13, 2015

"A bracing, comprehensive deconstruction."
A clinical assessment of the human origins of organized religion. Read full book review >
WHY I AM A SALAFI by Michael Muhammad Knight
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"A vigorous treatment of how the sacred, in all its multifarious forms, continues to exercise power, even if sometimes it just feels like 'we're arguing over what the mystery god intended to say in his address to a mystic in a cave some fifteen centuries ago.'"
Knight (Tripping with Allah: Islam, Drugs, and Writing, 2013, etc.) traverses the scenic highways of Islamic history, seeking paths that connect him to Muhammad. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"An occasionally repetitive but compelling study."
An impassioned investigative report tracing a deeply religious theme to the spate of civil rights violence from the 1950s until today. Read full book review >

THE BRIDGE BUILDER by Zev Chafets
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"In 2001, Eckstein self-published a fictionalized autobiography; here, Chafets furthers the rabbi's efforts to publicize and burnish his image."
Celebrating a controversial rabbi's life. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 5, 2015

"An impressive and comprehensive study of the book of Esther for Christian scholars."
A Bible commentary embraces literature, history, and theology to better understand the book of Esther. Read full book review >
What the Enemy Thinks by Gail Picco
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 30, 2015

"Overdrawn yet readable portrait of collective advocacy and friendship at work, spearheaded by a valiant, relatable protagonist."
Former women's shelter counselor Picco, in her debut, traces the intertwining business and personal lives of an altruistic media consultancy executive. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: July 30, 2015

"A brief, emphatic call for Christians to take heart in the sheer attentiveness of God."
A brief Christian devotional centering on the omniscience of God. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: July 30, 2015

"An often cutting work that calls down a plague on the houses of all domineering belief systems."
An extended diatribe against organized religions as well as atheism. Read full book review >
Stepping Out by S. T. Stone
RELIGION
Released: July 29, 2015

"An unassuming faith memoir and handbook for curious Christians."
From debut author Stone, a beginner's guide to the basics of the Christian faith. Read full book review >
THIS IS NOT A LOVE STORY by Judy Brown
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 28, 2015

"A tender story gently told."
A child's perspective on a family's ordeal. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >