Religion Book Reviews (page 5)

Thar She Blows by James Ragsdale
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 8, 2016

"A confounding account of the author's life in horse racing."
In this hybrid work of spiritualism, memoir, and nonfiction, debut author Ragsdale takes the reader through his history with the sport of horse racing, from his younger years sneaking away from jobs for a few hours at the track to his later ownership of multiple thoroughbreds. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"The traumatic and illuminating events suffered by a teenage girl who dared to say she was gay in a religious community that doesn't readily accept homosexuality."
A memoir of a lesbian Mormon who stood up for her rights. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2016

"Timely, authoritative, and immensely depressing."
A visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution's Doha Center examines the emergence, growth, and evolution of the Syrian jihad from 2011 to 2015. Read full book review >
WAY OF LOVE by Norman Wirzba
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 2016

"A thoughtful exposition on love and its reverberations throughout creation."
Taking "God is love" seriously. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: March 1, 2016

"An intriguing new angle on the well-worn field of 'historical Jesus' studies."
Understanding the role of memory in the formation of the Christian Gospels. Read full book review >

APOSTLE by Tom Bissell
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 2016

"A rich, contentious, and challenging book."
A deep dive into the heart of the New Testament, crossing continents and cross-referencing texts. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"Impressively vast in scope and content, Ostler's work is most accessible to fellow specialists but should intrigue dedicated readers as well."
The effects of religion on language are well-known; what about the effects of language on religion? Read full book review >
PUTTING GOD SECOND by Donniel Hartman
RELIGION
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"A stimulating and sure-to-be discussed critique of monotheism."
Why, asks Hartman (The Boundaries of Judaism, 2007, etc.), do so many religious groups and individuals fail to live up to the standards of their faith traditions? Read full book review >
STRANGE GODS by Susan Jacoby
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Jacoby draws the first detailed maps of a terrain that has been very much in need of intelligent, careful cartography."
In a work blending culture, religion, history, biography, and a bit of memoir (with more than a soupcon of attitude), the author of The Great Agnostic: Robert Ingersoll and American Freethought (2013, etc.) returns with a revealing historical analysis of religious conversions.Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"The book shows some promise, but much of it is largely unnecessary and sensationalist."
A critical look at what many people think is in the Bible. Read full book review >
REVELATION by Dennis Covington
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Far from uninteresting but too often self-indulgent and unsatisfying."
A search for faith amid war, terror, and family strife. Read full book review >
Devotional Guide by Gloria Saddler-Reed
RELIGION
Released: Feb. 5, 2016

"Pat, underdeveloped Bible lessons that promise quick conflict resolutions."
Christians fighting against secret grievances can get help from the Scriptures and their faith, according to this debut devotional guide. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >