Religion Book Reviews (page 5)

TWO CENTS PLAIN by Martin Lemelman
Released: Sept. 5, 2010

"'Life is the biggest bargain. You get it for free,' reads one of the Yiddish sayings that introduce the chapters, in a book that is both a celebration and an affirmation of life."
Memory comes alive in this compelling amalgam of drawing, narrative and archival photography. Read full book review >
Released: May 1, 2010

"A stunning, riveting commentary."
In this sequel to the groundbreaking Terror and Liberalism (2003, etc.), political writer and New Republic contributing editor Berman analyzes the rise of the Islamist totalitarian movement and the Western media's troubling inability—or unwillingness—to identify and investigate its implications. Read full book review >

BONHOEFFER by Eric Metaxas
Released: April 20, 2010

"A definitive Bonhoeffer biography for the 21st century."
A welcome new biography of one of the 20th century's leading lights. Read full book review >
THE CASE FOR GOD by Karen Armstrong
Released: Sept. 25, 2009

"Accessible, intriguing study of how we see God."
Fascinating journey through Western civilization's ongoing attempts to understand and explain the concept of God. Read full book review >
Released: July 9, 2009

"Genre-bending at its best."
In a lively blend of religious history, humor and quirky travel narrative, accomplished travel writer Farley (Writing/New York Univ.) chronicles his capricious journey to a tiny medieval Italian village in search of a controversial relic—the foreskin of Jesus Christ. Read full book review >

Released: April 1, 2009

"A work of towering research and conviction that will surely enliven academic debates for years to come."
Diner (American Jewish History/New York Univ.; The Jews of the United States, 1654 to 2000, 2004, etc.) hurls a passionate, well-delineated attack on the conventional view that postwar Jews and survivors wanted to forget the Holocaust rather than memorialize the tragedy. Read full book review >
Released: March 17, 2009

"A persuasive proposal that two rich empires took a dark detour from Europe's Enlightenment and never completely recovered."
Images and insights distilled from a record of terrors inflicted over nearly four centuries. Read full book review >
1948 by Uri Avnery
Released: Feb. 1, 2009

"Finally available in English, this skillfully written antiwar text is assuredly a classic."
A remarkable account of the bloody war for the establishment of the Jewish state, written by a young soldier in the midst of conflict. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 6, 2008

"An exemplary entry in the history of ideas."
Nadler (Philosophy/Univ. of Wisconsin; Rembrandt's Jews, 2003, etc.) recounts a major episode in the history of early modern philosophy. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"A must-read for anyone seeking to understand how cults operate and view themselves in relation to the world."
Page-turning account of growing up at the heart of a fringe religion. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 1, 2008

"A creative, unusual mix of memoir and travel narrative."
Canadian playwright and poet Garfinkel (Glass Psalms, 2005, etc.) considers the quandary of Zionism in this account of his travels in Israel and Palestine. Read full book review >
Released: July 8, 2008

"A masterly narrative that captures the religious fervor, brutality and mayhem of this intensive contest for the 'center of the world.'"
Exciting re-creation of the epic mid-16th-century struggle between the encroaching Ottoman Empire and the beleaguered Christian Europeans. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >