Religion Book Reviews (page 5)

RELIGION
Released: Oct. 5, 2010

"Humble, challenging and inspiring."
With the assistance of science journalist Olson (Mapping Human History: Discovering the Past Through Our Genes, 2002, etc.), Bad Religion leader Graffin presents a memoir of a life lived "at the intersection of evolutionary biology and punk rock." Read full book review >
TWO CENTS PLAIN by Martin Lemelman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 5, 2010

"'Life is the biggest bargain. You get it for free,' reads one of the Yiddish sayings that introduce the chapters, in a book that is both a celebration and an affirmation of life."
Memory comes alive in this compelling amalgam of drawing, narrative and archival photography. Read full book review >

THE FLIGHT OF THE INTELLECTUALS by Paul Berman
HISTORY
Released: May 1, 2010

"A stunning, riveting commentary."
In this sequel to the groundbreaking Terror and Liberalism (2003, etc.), political writer and New Republic contributing editor Berman analyzes the rise of the Islamist totalitarian movement and the Western media's troubling inability—or unwillingness—to identify and investigate its implications. Read full book review >
BONHOEFFER by Eric Metaxas
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 20, 2010

"A definitive Bonhoeffer biography for the 21st century."
A welcome new biography of one of the 20th century's leading lights. Read full book review >
THE CASE FOR GOD by Karen Armstrong
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 25, 2009

"Accessible, intriguing study of how we see God."
Fascinating journey through Western civilization's ongoing attempts to understand and explain the concept of God. Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: July 9, 2009

"Genre-bending at its best."
In a lively blend of religious history, humor and quirky travel narrative, accomplished travel writer Farley (Writing/New York Univ.) chronicles his capricious journey to a tiny medieval Italian village in search of a controversial relic—the foreskin of Jesus Christ. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 1, 2009

"A work of towering research and conviction that will surely enliven academic debates for years to come."
Diner (American Jewish History/New York Univ.; The Jews of the United States, 1654 to 2000, 2004, etc.) hurls a passionate, well-delineated attack on the conventional view that postwar Jews and survivors wanted to forget the Holocaust rather than memorialize the tragedy. Read full book review >
INQUISITION by Toby Green
RELIGION
Released: March 17, 2009

"A persuasive proposal that two rich empires took a dark detour from Europe's Enlightenment and never completely recovered."
Images and insights distilled from a record of terrors inflicted over nearly four centuries. Read full book review >
1948 by Uri Avnery
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2009

"Finally available in English, this skillfully written antiwar text is assuredly a classic."
A remarkable account of the bloody war for the establishment of the Jewish state, written by a young soldier in the midst of conflict. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 6, 2008

"An exemplary entry in the history of ideas."
Nadler (Philosophy/Univ. of Wisconsin; Rembrandt's Jews, 2003, etc.) recounts a major episode in the history of early modern philosophy. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"A must-read for anyone seeking to understand how cults operate and view themselves in relation to the world."
Page-turning account of growing up at the heart of a fringe religion. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 2008

"A creative, unusual mix of memoir and travel narrative."
Canadian playwright and poet Garfinkel (Glass Psalms, 2005, etc.) considers the quandary of Zionism in this account of his travels in Israel and Palestine. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >