Religion Book Reviews (page 6)

IF NUNS RULED THE WORLD by Jo Piazza
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 2, 2014

"Entertaining essays on the inspiring work various sisters are accomplishing in the world."
How a group of sisters is making changes in the world. Read full book review >
THE QUEST FOR A MORAL COMPASS by Kenan Malik
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 2, 2014

"An excellent survey for intermediate students of philosophy and a fine course in self-education for general readers."
God is dead, says Nietzsche. Nietzsche is dead, says God. Dead or not, Nietzsche is wrong, writes British neurobiologist and philosopher Malik—and so is sophist Thrasymachus, for that matter. Read full book review >

THE STRUGGLE FOR PAKISTAN by Ayesha Jalal
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 2014

"A hard sell for nonacademic readers but an elucidating journey for scholars."
A scholarly, depressing portrait of a country whose allegiance to Islam has not been able to hold it together nor prevent its being convulsed by cycles of violence. Read full book review >
The Father's Business and the Spiritual Cross by Festus Enumah
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 29, 2014

"A careful, well-grounded explication of the Christian Passion narrative."
Enumah (The Innocent Blood and Judas Iscariot, 2002) presents a treatise that focuses on the miracle at the very heart of Christianity: the Resurrection of Jesus Christ. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Aug. 26, 2014

"A vivid history of 'the collaboration and integration of the Muslim, Jewish, and Christian peoples of the Mediterranean that laid the foundation for the modern world.'"
A dramatic review of Mediterranean history in the Middle Ages. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Aug. 24, 2014

"Impeccably researched but likely too dense for general readers."
A distinguished Princeton social sciences professor studies the fraught intersection of race, religion and ethnicity in Texas since Reconstruction. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 19, 2014

"An energetic presentation of our complicated relationship with God, whom we have welcomed with 'open arms, congressional protection, free speech, and tax-exempt status.'"
Turner (Hear No Evil: My Story of Innocence, Music, and the Holy Ghost, 2010, etc.) surveys the American molding and remolding of God to fit our often curious convictions, a tradition as natively ingrained as "playing baseball, cruising strip mall parking lots, and popping antidepressants." Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 15, 2014

"An unvarnished, mostly bewildered and touchingly human memoir."
Two years as a Mormon missionary in Belgium. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 15, 2014

"Slow and steady yet highly readable; an intriguing look at deciphering Scripture."
Debut author Potts offers a guide to understanding the Bible in its original Hebrew. Read full book review >
GOD IN THE TIME OF THE INTERNET by Phillip Shirvington
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 13, 2014

"An outlandish but exhaustively thought-out imagining of humanity's ultimate destiny."
A searching debut treatise that offers alternatives to typical religious ideas of the afterlife. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 11, 2014

"A collection of brief, engaging thoughts to complement Christian Bible study."
King (Steps to the Victorious Walk, 2007, etc.), an evangelist pastor, offers an array of short daily devotionals about Bible verses and their applications to daily life. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Aug. 7, 2014

"A sometimes-startling and always thought-provoking new look at the fundamental tenets of Christianity."
A personal, idiosyncratic study of Jesus Christ and Christianity. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >