Religion Book Reviews (page 6)

THE SUPER NATURAL by Jeffrey J. Kripal
RELIGION
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"A thought-provoking, intelligent reconceptualization of supernatural events."
A religious historian and a popular fiction writer and mystic collaborate to adopt unexplained phenomena into the realm of natural occurrences. Read full book review >
STOLEN WORDS by Mark Glickman
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"The text is approachable and the material is invaluable. The written word prevails."
The odyssey of Jewish books in the wake of the Holocaust. Read full book review >

The Journey of a Spiritual Traveler by Michael Kurtz
RELIGION
Released: Jan. 25, 2016

"A set of philosophical but accessible ruminations on Christian life."
A series of meditative essays on the joys and challenges of a spiritual life. Read full book review >
Understanding God's Contracts with Mankind by J. William Howerton
RELIGION
Released: Jan. 21, 2016

"A solid, brief introduction to Christian doctrine that should appeal to the like-minded."
A debut book offers a defense of Christian belief in the midst of an increasingly secular age. Read full book review >
JUDAS by Peter Stanford
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 12, 2016

"A straightforward biography that thankfully avoids preaching. Readers curious about Judas' broad effect on world history will welcome this book."
A biography of one of the most reviled men in history, a perpetual scapegoat representing the deepest root of anti-Semitism and, in medieval times, usury. Read full book review >

Holy Revelation by Taylor Russell Stone
RELIGION
Released: Jan. 12, 2016

"A strange collection of biblical codes that lacks wide appeal."
A debut book offers a key to figuring out the numerical codes embedded in the Bible. Read full book review >
THE SOUND OF GRAVEL by Ruth Wariner
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"An unsentimental yet wholly moving memoir."
A high school Spanish teacher's memoir about a peripatetic, often turbulent childhood and adolescence spent among fundamentalist Mormons. Read full book review >
The Mustard Seed by Peter Szondy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"A sentimental parable about how a young girl's miracles arise from the power of her faith alone."
In Szondy's debut Christian novel, a young girl cures a paralyzed friend and then performs other divine miracles in an idyllic American town, changing people's lives. Read full book review >
Hide and Watch by Jill Hicks Lawson
RELIGION
Released: Jan. 4, 2016

"An economically written testimony that will appeal to Christians seeking to reconcile their faith with loss."
A Christian testimony about a family that faced years of medical challenges. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Dec. 17, 2015

"A vehement, lyrical restatement of biblical strictures, full of fire and brimstone."
This thunderous volume of Christian apologetics preaches New Testament dogma with Old Testament vigor. Read full book review >
Imperience by Erik Knud-Hansen
RELIGION
Released: Dec. 11, 2015

"A spiritually transporting, thought-provoking volume."
A far-reaching study explores pathways to awakening absolute consciousness. Read full book review >
Meditation Moments by Victor Stobbe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 9, 2015

"A worthy contribution to the afterlife of biblical poetry."
Debut author Stobbe gives modern readers a fresh look at the Psalms in this clever poetic experiment. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >