Religion Book Reviews (page 8)

Thar She Blows by James Ragsdale
Released: March 8, 2016

"A confounding account of the author's life in horse racing."
In this hybrid work of spiritualism, memoir, and nonfiction, debut author Ragsdale takes the reader through his history with the sport of horse racing, from his younger years sneaking away from jobs for a few hours at the track to his later ownership of multiple thoroughbreds. Read full book review >
Who Made God?  by Edgar Andrews
Released: March 2, 2016

"A thoughtful and well-written argument for the existence of God."
Andrews (A Glorious High Throne, 2003, etc.) challenges the assertions of New Atheists in this volume, now in its third edition.Read full book review >

Released: March 1, 2016

"The traumatic and illuminating events suffered by a teenage girl who dared to say she was gay in a religious community that doesn't readily accept homosexuality."
A memoir of a lesbian Mormon who stood up for her rights. Read full book review >
Released: March 1, 2016

"Timely, authoritative, and immensely depressing."
A visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution's Doha Center examines the emergence, growth, and evolution of the Syrian jihad from 2011 to 2015. Read full book review >
WAY OF LOVE by Norman Wirzba
Released: March 1, 2016

"A thoughtful exposition on love and its reverberations throughout creation."
Taking "God is love" seriously. Read full book review >

Released: March 1, 2016

"An intriguing new angle on the well-worn field of 'historical Jesus' studies."
Understanding the role of memory in the formation of the Christian Gospels. Read full book review >
APOSTLE by Tom Bissell
Released: March 1, 2016

"A rich, contentious, and challenging book."
A deep dive into the heart of the New Testament, crossing continents and cross-referencing texts. Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"Impressively vast in scope and content, Ostler's work is most accessible to fellow specialists but should intrigue dedicated readers as well."
The effects of religion on language are well-known; what about the effects of language on religion? Read full book review >
Protestants by Alain Marshall
Released: Feb. 22, 2016

"Diverting historical stories hampered by garbled prose."
In short, anecdotal chapters, this conversational work profiles mostly lesser-known English separatists from the early 17th century. Read full book review >
PUTTING GOD SECOND by Donniel Hartman
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"A stimulating and sure-to-be discussed critique of monotheism."
Why, asks Hartman (The Boundaries of Judaism, 2007, etc.), do so many religious groups and individuals fail to live up to the standards of their faith traditions? Read full book review >
STRANGE GODS by Susan Jacoby
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Jacoby draws the first detailed maps of a terrain that has been very much in need of intelligent, careful cartography."
In a work blending culture, religion, history, biography, and a bit of memoir (with more than a soupcon of attitude), the author of The Great Agnostic: Robert Ingersoll and American Freethought (2013, etc.) returns with a revealing historical analysis of religious conversions.Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"The book shows some promise, but much of it is largely unnecessary and sensationalist."
A critical look at what many people think is in the Bible. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
H.W. Brands
October 11, 2016

As noted historian H.W. Brands reveals in his new book The General vs. the President: MacArthur and Truman at the Brink of Nuclear War, at the height of the Korean War, President Harry S. Truman committed a gaffe that sent shock waves around the world. When asked by a reporter about the possible use of atomic weapons in response to China's entry into the war, Truman replied testily, "The military commander in the field will have charge of the use of the weapons, as he always has." This suggested that General Douglas MacArthur, the willful, fearless, and highly decorated commander of the American and U.N. forces, had his finger on the nuclear trigger. A correction quickly followed, but the damage was done; two visions for America's path forward were clearly in opposition, and one man would have to make way. Truman was one of the most unpopular presidents in American history. General MacArthur, by contrast, was incredibly popular, as untouchable as any officer has ever been in America. The contest of wills between these two titanic characters unfolds against the turbulent backdrop of a faraway war and terrors conjured at home by Joseph McCarthy. “An exciting, well-written comparison study of two American leaders at loggerheads during the Korean War crisis,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >