Religion Book Reviews (page 9)

REVELATION by Dennis Covington
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Far from uninteresting but too often self-indulgent and unsatisfying."
A search for faith amid war, terror, and family strife. Read full book review >
Devotional Guide by Gloria Saddler-Reed
Released: Feb. 5, 2016

"Pat, underdeveloped Bible lessons that promise quick conflict resolutions."
Christians fighting against secret grievances can get help from the Scriptures and their faith, according to this debut devotional guide. Read full book review >

THE SUPER NATURAL by Jeffrey J. Kripal
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"A thought-provoking, intelligent reconceptualization of supernatural events."
A religious historian and a popular fiction writer and mystic collaborate to adopt unexplained phenomena into the realm of natural occurrences. Read full book review >
STOLEN WORDS by Mark Glickman
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"The text is approachable and the material is invaluable. The written word prevails."
The odyssey of Jewish books in the wake of the Holocaust. Read full book review >
The Journey of a Spiritual Traveler by Michael Kurtz
Released: Jan. 25, 2016

"A set of philosophical but accessible ruminations on Christian life."
A series of meditative essays on the joys and challenges of a spiritual life. Read full book review >

Understanding God's Contracts with Mankind by J. William Howerton
Released: Jan. 21, 2016

"A solid, brief introduction to Christian doctrine that should appeal to the like-minded."
A debut book offers a defense of Christian belief in the midst of an increasingly secular age. Read full book review >
JUDAS by Peter Stanford
Released: Jan. 12, 2016

"A straightforward biography that thankfully avoids preaching. Readers curious about Judas' broad effect on world history will welcome this book."
A biography of one of the most reviled men in history, a perpetual scapegoat representing the deepest root of anti-Semitism and, in medieval times, usury. Read full book review >
Holy Revelation by Taylor Russell Stone
Released: Jan. 12, 2016

"A strange collection of biblical codes that lacks wide appeal."
A debut book offers a key to figuring out the numerical codes embedded in the Bible. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"An unsentimental yet wholly moving memoir."
A high school Spanish teacher's memoir about a peripatetic, often turbulent childhood and adolescence spent among fundamentalist Mormons. Read full book review >
The Mustard Seed by Peter Szondy
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"A sentimental parable about how a young girl's miracles arise from the power of her faith alone."
In Szondy's debut Christian novel, a young girl cures a paralyzed friend and then performs other divine miracles in an idyllic American town, changing people's lives. Read full book review >
Christ's 40 Commandments by Renee Valverde Wagenblatt
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"A crisp, lucid organizational tool kit for categorizing Jesus' teachings."
A debut collection of the moral and social precepts attributed to Jesus Christ in the Bible. Read full book review >
Hide and Watch by Jill Hicks Lawson
Released: Jan. 4, 2016

"An economically written testimony that will appeal to Christians seeking to reconcile their faith with loss."
A Christian testimony about a family that faced years of medical challenges. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
H.W. Brands
October 11, 2016

As noted historian H.W. Brands reveals in his new book The General vs. the President: MacArthur and Truman at the Brink of Nuclear War, at the height of the Korean War, President Harry S. Truman committed a gaffe that sent shock waves around the world. When asked by a reporter about the possible use of atomic weapons in response to China's entry into the war, Truman replied testily, "The military commander in the field will have charge of the use of the weapons, as he always has." This suggested that General Douglas MacArthur, the willful, fearless, and highly decorated commander of the American and U.N. forces, had his finger on the nuclear trigger. A correction quickly followed, but the damage was done; two visions for America's path forward were clearly in opposition, and one man would have to make way. Truman was one of the most unpopular presidents in American history. General MacArthur, by contrast, was incredibly popular, as untouchable as any officer has ever been in America. The contest of wills between these two titanic characters unfolds against the turbulent backdrop of a faraway war and terrors conjured at home by Joseph McCarthy. “An exciting, well-written comparison study of two American leaders at loggerheads during the Korean War crisis,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >