Religion Book Reviews (page 9)

Protestants by Alain Marshall
Released: Feb. 22, 2016

"Diverting historical stories hampered by garbled prose."
In short, anecdotal chapters, this conversational work profiles mostly lesser-known English separatists from the early 17th century. Read full book review >
PUTTING GOD SECOND by Donniel Hartman
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"A stimulating and sure-to-be discussed critique of monotheism."
Why, asks Hartman (The Boundaries of Judaism, 2007, etc.), do so many religious groups and individuals fail to live up to the standards of their faith traditions? Read full book review >

STRANGE GODS by Susan Jacoby
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Jacoby draws the first detailed maps of a terrain that has been very much in need of intelligent, careful cartography."
In a work blending culture, religion, history, biography, and a bit of memoir (with more than a soupcon of attitude), the author of The Great Agnostic: Robert Ingersoll and American Freethought (2013, etc.) returns with a revealing historical analysis of religious conversions.Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"The book shows some promise, but much of it is largely unnecessary and sensationalist."
A critical look at what many people think is in the Bible. Read full book review >
REVELATION by Dennis Covington
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Far from uninteresting but too often self-indulgent and unsatisfying."
A search for faith amid war, terror, and family strife. Read full book review >

Devotional Guide by Gloria Saddler-Reed
Released: Feb. 5, 2016

"Pat, underdeveloped Bible lessons that promise quick conflict resolutions."
Christians fighting against secret grievances can get help from the Scriptures and their faith, according to this debut devotional guide. Read full book review >
THE SUPER NATURAL by Jeffrey J. Kripal
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"A thought-provoking, intelligent reconceptualization of supernatural events."
A religious historian and a popular fiction writer and mystic collaborate to adopt unexplained phenomena into the realm of natural occurrences. Read full book review >
STOLEN WORDS by Mark Glickman
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"The text is approachable and the material is invaluable. The written word prevails."
The odyssey of Jewish books in the wake of the Holocaust. Read full book review >
The Journey of a Spiritual Traveler by Michael Kurtz
Released: Jan. 25, 2016

"A set of philosophical but accessible ruminations on Christian life."
A series of meditative essays on the joys and challenges of a spiritual life. Read full book review >
Understanding God's Contracts with Mankind by J. William Howerton
Released: Jan. 21, 2016

"A solid, brief introduction to Christian doctrine that should appeal to the like-minded."
A debut book offers a defense of Christian belief in the midst of an increasingly secular age. Read full book review >
JUDAS by Peter Stanford
Released: Jan. 12, 2016

"A straightforward biography that thankfully avoids preaching. Readers curious about Judas' broad effect on world history will welcome this book."
A biography of one of the most reviled men in history, a perpetual scapegoat representing the deepest root of anti-Semitism and, in medieval times, usury. Read full book review >
Holy Revelation by Taylor Russell Stone
Released: Jan. 12, 2016

"A strange collection of biblical codes that lacks wide appeal."
A debut book offers a key to figuring out the numerical codes embedded in the Bible. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Maria Goodavage
October 24, 2016

Wherever the president goes, there will be dogs. They’ll be there no matter what the country or state. They’ll be there regardless of the political climate, the danger level, the weather, or the hour. Maria Goodavage’s new book Secret Service Dogs immerses readers in the heart of this elite world of canine teams who protect first families, popes, and presidential candidates: the selection of dogs and handlers, their year-round training, their missions around the world, and, most important, the bond—the glue that holds the teams together and can mean the difference between finding bombs and terrorists or letting them slip by. Secret Service Dogs celebrates the Secret Service’s most unforgettable canine heroes. It is a must-read for fans of Maria Goodavage, anyone who wants a rare inside view of the United States Secret Service, or just loves dogs. “Goodavage’s subjects and their companions are quirky and dedicated enough to engage readers wondering about those dogs on the White House lawn,” our reviewer writes. View video >