Religion Book Reviews

STRANGE GODS by Susan Jacoby
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Jacoby draws the first detailed maps of a terrain that has been very much in need of intelligent, careful cartography."
In a work blending culture, religion, history, biography, and a bit of memoir (with more than a soupcon of attitude), the author of The Great Agnostic: Robert Ingersoll and American Freethought (2013, etc.) returns with a revealing historical analysis of religious conversions.Read full book review >
APOSTLE by Tom Bissell
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 2016

"A rich, contentious, and challenging book."
A deep dive into the heart of the New Testament, crossing continents and cross-referencing texts. Read full book review >

THE LOST BOOK OF MOSES by Chanan Tigay
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 22, 2016

"A work of broad appeal, for the history buff and mystery lover alike."
The search for the world's oldest biblical manuscript. Read full book review >
HOLY LANDS by Nicolas Pelham
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 12, 2016

"A lively, succinct, nonpolemical study that will offer much thought for discussion."
A sound, accessible argument for why returning to the mixed-faith communities living among each other in the Ottoman model might just save the Middle East. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >