Tragedy Transformed by Gordon Grose
Released: April 27, 2015

"A pragmatic, uplifting examination of the role that tragedy plays in people's lives."
A debut guide to the redemptive power of suffering, as seen through the prism of the book of Job. Read full book review >
Sacrifice and Sail On by Philip H. Lin
Released: June 22, 2014

"A worshipful portrait of a humble Chinese Christian preacher and author."
The English translation of a book about a dedicated Christian. Read full book review >

WHY BE JEWISH? by Edgar M. Bronfman
Released: March 22, 2016

"One man's personal call to laggard Jews to study, learn, and seek justice in a broken world. Readers of other persuasions may also profit from his insight into bits of Jewish thought and practice."
The late businessman and philanthropist answers his title's question with a last testament of sorts. Read full book review >
STRANGE GODS by Susan Jacoby
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Jacoby draws the first detailed maps of a terrain that has been very much in need of intelligent, careful cartography."
In a work blending culture, religion, history, biography, and a bit of memoir (with more than a soupcon of attitude), the author of The Great Agnostic: Robert Ingersoll and American Freethought (2013, etc.) returns with a revealing historical analysis of religious conversions.Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"While more historical context would be useful, this is a provocative work of dogged investigative research."
An investigative report of the current pope's "revolution" to reform Vatican finances. Read full book review >

Sightseeing in the Undiscovered Country by Louisa Oakley Green
Released: Sept. 23, 2015

"A compassionate, intelligent survey of supernatural experiences."
The wife of a psychic gathers reports from everyday people who believe they've glimpsed the beyond. Read full book review >
The Great Mother Bible by Mare Cromwell
Released: April 9, 2015

"Positive, powerful insights about love, spirituality, the universe, and Mother Earth."
A nature mystic shares her latest series of engaging conversations with Mother Earth in this spiritual guide. Read full book review >
Released: July 30, 2015

"An often cutting work that calls down a plague on the houses of all domineering belief systems."
An extended diatribe against organized religions as well as atheism. Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 6, 2015

"A dense and important end-times study that offers serious, credible challenges to long-standing scriptural readings."
An exhaustive depiction of the end times. Read full book review >
God So Loved... by Steve Ink
Released: May 5, 2015

"A succinct but thorough analysis of the Christian faith that raises thought-provoking questions in a personable voice."
An investigation into the foundations of Christianity through one of its most popular verses. Read full book review >
PUTTING GOD SECOND by Donniel Hartman
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"A stimulating and sure-to-be discussed critique of monotheism."
Why, asks Hartman (The Boundaries of Judaism, 2007, etc.), do so many religious groups and individuals fail to live up to the standards of their faith traditions? Read full book review >

"Inspirational without being patronizing; a well-organized collection."
Christian-themed first-person accounts on loss and redemption. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >