Religion Book Reviews

Jesus, One Man, Two Faiths by Ron Messier
Released: Oct. 1, 2010

"A thoughtful, temperate call for Muslims and Christians to recognize their overlapping religious heritages."
A scholarly analysis of the deeply shared common ground of two faiths. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"An unsentimental yet wholly moving memoir."
A high school Spanish teacher's memoir about a peripatetic, often turbulent childhood and adolescence spent among fundamentalist Mormons. Read full book review >

Released: Dec. 1, 2015

"An illuminating biography of 'an intelligent and thoughtful man.'"
The life and times of a Spanish monarch who invigorated cultural life. Read full book review >
NOT IN GOD'S NAME by Jonathan Sacks
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"A humane, literate, and sincere book, one with something truly new to say."
A remarkable exploration of the reasons behind religious violence and solutions for stopping it. Read full book review >
Released: June 22, 2015

"A surprisingly winning long-distance love story."
The story of a Christian relationship, revealed in a series of letters. Read full book review >

AUGUSTINE by Robin Lane Fox
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"An erudite and ordered reading of Augustine's Confessions and a worthy addition to any library on early Christianity."
A comprehensive literary biography of the great Christian thinker Augustine (354-430). Read full book review >
THE 613 by Archie Rand
Kirkus Star
by Archie Rand, illustrated by Archie Rand
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"As a book, it stands on its own rather than merely evoking a larger wall display, reaching a much wider audience in the process."
A monumental art project is transformed into wildly ambitious graphic literature. Read full book review >
BATTLING THE GODS by Tim Whitmarsh
Released: Nov. 13, 2015

"Though not for those seeking a light read, this is a seminal work on the subject, to be studied, reread, and referenced."
Whitmarsh (Greek Culture/Univ. of Cambridge; Beyond the Second Sophistic: Adventures in Greek Postclassicism, 2013, etc.) explores the evolution of atheism from Homer to the Roman Empire.Read full book review >
The Devil's Way by Lamees A.
Released: May 6, 2015

"A protracted, argument-starting debate between the Devil and an advocate for humanity."
A dramatized dialogue on the nature of good and evil, conducted between a young man and the devil himself. Read full book review >
BLACK FLAGS by Joby Warrick
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"Warrick stops short of offering policy solutions, but he provides a valuable, readable introduction to a pressing international security threat."
Crisply written, chilling account of the personalities behind the emergence of the Islamic State, or ISIS. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 20, 2015

"An enchanting and addictive report shedding much-needed light on a spiritualistic community obfuscated by historical misinterpretation and pop-culture derision."
A self-avowed skeptic investigates the shadowy world of modern witchcraft. Read full book review >
Living Fulfilled... by Lisa Thomas-McMillan
Released: May 11, 2015

"A somewhat scattered but ultimately heartwarming story of fighting for justice."
This debut memoir about Thomas-McMillan's campaigns to raise awareness of hunger and abolish the death penalty also serves as a practical guide to volunteerism. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >