SIRGA: QUEEN OF THE AFRICAN BUSH by Rene Guillot
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SIRGA: QUEEN OF THE AFRICAN BUSH

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The affinity between a chieftain's son and a female lion cub born of proud stock on the same day makes up the nucleus of this tender but adventurous story by the author of The 397th White Elephant. When the boy, Ule, is stolen as a slave by a hostile tribe, it is his rapport with wild animals, a rapport nurtured by his early friendship with Sirga, the cub, that wins him the position of herdsman of the tribes. Free to wander the bush, he makes his way back to his ravaged village, and with the proud mark of the lion on his face, prepares to assume the role of man and chieftain. Richly ornamented with description of life in the bush, this novel of adventure and romance contains a poignant depiction of the nature of a wild and highly intelligent animal in her unique reaction to a human being of stature. Tender without being sentimental, Rene Guillot's characters are at every point as compelling as they are convincing.

Pub Date: Aug. 14th, 1959
Publisher: Criterion