THE DEADLY SILENCE by Renee Buse

THE DEADLY SILENCE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Back in November 1957, in the small town of Apalachin, New York, the hometown paper could have run this item in its social Column: ""Over one hundred intimates attended the barbecue given by Joe Barbara, short-time resident of the area. The guest list included such ignobles as Vito Genovese, ""Big John"" Ormento, Carmine Galante, and Giuseppe (""Pepe"") Controni. The festivities were broken off quite unexpectedly by police force partycrashers."" The above-named guests finally ended up in prison along with forty members of their organization due to the work of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics. This is the story of the Bureau's long-range fight against the big 'time traffickers and in particular, the Mafia. Set forth in a presentation that reads like fiction but is taken from the official files and court testimony of three interrelated narcotics cases, this shows the painstaking, Intricate work of the Bureau and the patient, and often heroic, efforts of its men. Two of the cases were broken by undercover agents with ""real life acting where there are no rehearsals and no retakes. If the agent misses a cue or if his timing is wrong, they carry him out in a box."" Eliott Ness had nothing on these agents, who, by the way, have been marked for death by jail-bird Genovese. A fine Job of crime reporting.

Pub Date: Sept. 24th, 1965
Publisher: Doubleday