JUNG'S PSYCHOLOGY AND ITS SOCIAL MEANING by

JUNG'S PSYCHOLOGY AND ITS SOCIAL MEANING

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An analysis of the psychologist's work, for itself and for its implications in the social sciences, that should stand well with other works in the field in its clarity, breadth and significance for present day psychology. Prof. Goodwin Watson's (Columbia Univ.) introduction provides a helpful placing of Jung in history, tying his ideas with Freud's, comparing them with those of Toynbee and Mumford who also measured the social psyche. There is the further characterization of Jung as thoroughly unsystematic in his writings and accordingly, the first part of Progoff's analysis is a recataloguing of Jung's thought, comprising in the main, the theories of the psyche and unconscious, the persons within the person, psychological types, neuroses and dreams. Part two considers these theories' portents for society. That Jung's modern man was troubled because established values no longer had any meaning for him, is a fact that emerges from discussions on the psyche in society and history, the group mind, archetypes and individuality, religion and so forth. Broad and liberally referenced, this will get its share of attention as a definitive work.

Publisher: Julian Press