THE PHILIPPINE COOKBOOK by Reynaldo Alejandro

THE PHILIPPINE COOKBOOK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Philippine cooking, all top-of-the-stove techniques, is part indigenous Pacific island (lots of coconut and coconut milk), part Oriental (soy sauce, ginger, sweet-and-sour), part Spanish (via an historic ""Mexican connection""), part Del Monte--as evident in a ""Fruit Salad, Philippine Style"" which calls for cream cheese, canned fruit cocktail, and canned pineapple chunks, with the note, ""The Filipino taste is for canned fruit, a hold-over from Colonial times. However, fresh fruit may be substituted if desired, sweetened to taste. . . ."" Fish, shrimp, chicken, and pork are staples; vegetables are mixed with meat or other ingredients, never plain; and sweets are plentiful and very sweet. Filipino-American caterer Alejandro, food coordinator for Bloomingdale's recent Philippines promotion, has adapted these relatively simple recipes for Americans but has retained such exotic ingredients as paris (a salty fermented fish extract) and appended a list of Philippine markets.

Pub Date: Jan. 21st, 1982
Publisher: Coward, McCann & Geoghegan