SUMMER LANDMARK by Richard Day

SUMMER LANDMARK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The little things of major import, in a child's landscape of a short, summer interlude on an Iowa farm, this has a discerning prose that adds validity to the unexceptional incidents. Joe Morgan, of Welsh heritage, visits an uncle, meets his great-grandmother and great-aunt, watches a cousin water-witching, goes to a carnival, sees a local boy bested in a prize fight, meets old and young relations, resents the wisdom of the hired man, gets a puppy from a litter, observes -- but does not comprehend -- the social implications of his uncle's laundress and her wayward sister.....When the hired man, because of his fits, is institutionalized as incurable -- Joe is sent home. Hanging on these inconclusive events is the quality and sad wonder of a child, of the feel and smell and touch of an Iowa farm, of the first person recall of reminiscence, of roots, heritage, permanent markers. Specialty reading rather than wide audience appeal.

Pub Date: Aug. 26th, 1947
Publisher: Macmillan