GUERRILLA MOVEMENTS IN LATIN AMERICA by Richard Gott

GUERRILLA MOVEMENTS IN LATIN AMERICA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Drawing on an extensive range of manifestos, speeches and polemical articles by major guerrilla leaders, commentators Debray, Gilly and Lartguey, excerpts from interviews and the worldwide left publications including the Cuban Pensamiento Critico, Gott has assembled one of the most complete pictures of these movements yet to emerge. Although little attempt is made at political analysis, this straightforward narrative of guerrilla uprisings in Peru, Guatemala, Bolivia, Venezuela and Colombia adumbrate a lugubrious future for these movements. He divides the guerrilla upsurge into three rough stages: 1959-61, a period of student ferment; 1962-65, the linkage of new guerrilla movements with the traditional Communist Parties; 1966-69, when the Communists abandoned the guerrillas. The final chapter details Guevara's Bolivian failure in neutral military terms. Gott describes national contexts in terms of parliamentary politics alone: this weakness produces a view of the guerrillas unconnected with the state of the countries or the continent as a whole. A comparison with the course of the Cuban revolution, in which the guerrilla movement capitalized on the collapse of the Batista regime, would have provided a necessary contrast to the five movements described. In addition to Guevara, Camillo Torres of Colombia, Douglas Bravo of Venezuela, Yon Sosa and Turcios of Guatemala, Lobaton and de la Puente of Peru receive prominent investigation. There is some fascinating information about the isolated peasant republics of Colombia, which survived from the 1930's until l964-65, when a huge army trained and equipped by the U.S. smashed them. Excellent source material.

Pub Date: March 19th, 1971
ISBN: 190542258X
Publisher: Doubleday