DANCE DOWN THE MOUNTAIN by Richard Hammer

DANCE DOWN THE MOUNTAIN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A clichÉd and maudlin love story, set in 70's Hollywood. Novelist and ex-journalist Harry Miller marries ballerina Katie Summers; they move from New York to Hollywood so that Katie can join a new ballet company; Katie's hit by a car, will never dance again. With bills piling up, and no money coming in, Harry turns to old Vietnam buddy, now mega-successful producer, Phil Garland. Phil gives Katie a job teaching dance and introduces Harry to Charlie Stuart, a washed-up producer. Charlie hires Harry to ghost a screenplay; Harry's so good that the screenplay wins an Oscar, but nobody knows he wrote it. And Katie's so beautiful that everyone wants her in their movies. She finally relents (they're both just oozing integrity; he won't write another screenplay--he's a novelist, damnit--and Phil has to beg Katie to be in his movie), and becomes a star. Then monstrous Winnie Argoth, the most powerful agent in town, gets her claws into Katie, and wages a campaign to get Harry out of her life. Fed up with Winnie's influence, Harry leaves Katie. Back in New York, he becomes a successful and respected novelist, while Katie's career moves forward. Years later, Harry flies out to Hollywood on business. Now married to alcoholic Charlie Stuart, Katie tells Harry she's miserable, so Harry gets her back. Charlie Stuart is interesting, but he belongs in a better novel. Otherwise, Hammer (Mr. Jacobson's War; The Vatican Connection: The CBS Murders) has turned out an overwrought romance, mawkish and cluttered with cutesy pillow-talk and if-only-I-had-knowns.

Pub Date: Oct. 25th, 1988
Publisher: Watts