THE FAILURE OF U.S. ENERGY POLICY by Richard Mancke

THE FAILURE OF U.S. ENERGY POLICY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

At the root of the recent fuel manipulations Mancke sees no corporate collusion, but blackmail by what he considers free and independent oil-producing nations. His second premise is that nuclear fusion power technology, which admittedly would end ""fear of physical exhaustion of energy supplies,"" is ""yet unknown."" Thus the only possibility is repair work on the Rube Goldberg petroleum industry, and Mancke provides a manual. He acknowledges that there is no actual oil shortage and refuses to endorse zero industrial growth, but in effect winds up proposing cutbacks. He calls for more offshore wells, stockpiling (at a $170 million yearly cost) in addition to natural gas price hikes and reduction of energy demand through tax increases. He also advocates world competition against the off-producing nations, but provides no political or economic analysis of the multinational petroleum corporations, much less their relations with Third World providers of natural resources. Since Mancke ignores the industry itself, the impact of a possible recession, and current non-investment in safe, cheap future power sources, the book offers, not a thoughtful energy policy, but patchwork reforms, carburetion instead of transformation.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1974
Publisher: Columbia Univ. Press