PLAYING THE PRIVATE COLLEGE ADMISSIONS GAME by Richard Moll

PLAYING THE PRIVATE COLLEGE ADMISSIONS GAME

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Who hasn't wondered about the crazy-quilt pattern of college acceptances and rejections? Richard Moll, Admissions Director at Vassar, shows us how the admissions process works, and advises prospective students on every aspect of the application ordeal, with numerous examples from specific colleges. After an unfortunate opening--an endless dramatization of an admissions committee meeting--Moll gets down to specifics. He discusses application essays (providing several excellent samples); gives advice on getting through the interview (""Tell and Sell""); looks at college board exams (don't guess randomly); and more. Particularly interesting is the fact that ""highly selective"" colleges do not judge all applicants the same way. Moll says they admit five or more freshman divisions, so that ""applicants compete against each other within categories, not against all other candidates."" For example, there are intellects, specially talented, ""legacies"" (sons and daughters of alumni), all-American youth (the most diffuse category), and minorities. Private colleges are facing a declining market, Moil says, forcing them to recruit more actively than ever, and meaning that most are not ""highly selective"" today--a clear promotional gambit whose message is, ""Apply!

Pub Date: June 13th, 1979
Publisher: Times Books