BENEVOLENT AGGRESSION: Why Indigenous Cultures Must Be Destroyed for Their Own Benefit by Richard N. Farmer

BENEVOLENT AGGRESSION: Why Indigenous Cultures Must Be Destroyed for Their Own Benefit

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Professor Farmer's rambling observations about why the poor countries are poor and how they might become rich sound very much like they originated in the cafeteria over coffee at Indiana University where he is Chairman of the International Graduate School of Business. His central theme, casually inserted throughout the conversation and often expressed via metaphor, is that ""somehow, our friends in poorer countries will never have the chances we or our fathers had, to get on the development bus and see where it goes."" The strange word here is ""somehow"" -- he's supposed to be informing us about that very point! Never mind, just pass the cream and consider Albania: ""It is hard to get frightened by Albania -- better to ignore it."" OK with us. Now take atomic war: ""A major atomic war could really foul up most poor countries, as well as the rich ones."" Lot of truth to that, Professor. And these poor countries are in bad shape, war or no war: ""They have the worst of all possible worlds -- a population which is non-Western and not really all that concerned with work, saving, and all the rest. . . . In attempting to be nice guys and accommodate everyone, they end up not really doing the job for anyone. I wonder why?"" Tough question, Professor. ""So, in the end, or at least for the next fifty years, the poor are stuck with what they have, as always."" Sounds hopeless. Not entirely, ""the feasible option is to think small -- to figure out how to do all sorts of things with virtually no organization whatsoever."" You said it, Professor.

Pub Date: Jan. 5th, 1972
Publisher: McKay