BLACK JACK PERSHING by Richard O'Connor

BLACK JACK PERSHING

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Beginning with a Missouri boyhood, West Point, Apache and Sioux-chasing days, and a Negro command which earned his famous nickname, this unofficial biography traces the life of General Pershing through some of the most exciting and colorful days of American history. His days in Cuba and the Philippines, his Villa chase, and his assumption of command of the A.E.F., followed by vivid, visual accounts of the First World War, make fascinating reading. The history of the War of course forms the larger part of the book. In it Pershing's own iron character is set off against the intrigues of Haig to prevent an American army, of the bickering of staff conferences with Petain and Foche, and in the background, the rise of William Mitchell and the importance of airpower. The book does not penetrate deeply into the character of Pershing himself. Perhaps it would be impossible to do so. Rather, it carefully follows, gathers facts, documents, and lets the reader guess as to the psychology behind the strict, disciplinarian mask. Good job.

Pub Date: April 7th, 1961
Publisher: Doubleday