ENCHANTMENT AT DELPHI by Richard Purtill

ENCHANTMENT AT DELPHI

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

A gifted college student finds a misty tunnel that leads her back to a series of adventures at different times in ancient Greece. Alice Grant, like the author an avid student of Greek history and archaeology, meets Apollo, who inspires wonder but also terror, and then Apollo's competitor for the Delphic site, Dionysus, a joyful deity convincingly portrayed as an early advocate of women's rights. On later visits she observes the establishment of the shrine to Apollo and serves as Delphic Oracle. On her last return, she is delayed at a time during WW II and has an adventure involving the father of Nikos, whose romance with Alice has meanwhile been advancing in modern Greece. Purtill, a philosophy professor, has skillfully woven an exciting tale of time travel; his expertise lends depth and authenticity to the narrative but never burdens it. More perceptive readers will be intrigued by the speculation on how the actions of a time traveller might affect past, present or future and by the way past experience illuminates the present. The conclusion may not be wholly satisfying to romantics, but is inevitable to a philosopher. Fun to read and rewarding as well.

Pub Date: Sept. 10th, 1986
Page count: 176pp
Publisher: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich