THE WORLDLY EVANGELICALS by Richard Quebedeaux
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THE WORLDLY EVANGELICALS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Sociological and theological perspectives on Jimmy Carter and others (maybe 50 million others) by the knowledgeable author of The Young Evangelicals. In this lucid, comprehensive report, Quebedeaux explains who's who and where they stand, catalogs the institutional resources (astonishing) of each evangelical sub-group, and asks some probing questions about their place in American culture. Fifty years ago ""born again"" Christians meant simply fundamentalists, i.e., a fervent sect of uneducated and fiercely conservative lower-class individuals. Since then their numbers have grown astronomically, and they've broadened their narrow base to include members of every Protestant denomination, the middle class, the rich, Catholics, socialists, homosexuals, etc. But have they in the process lost some of their identity? In entering the mainstream have they not assimilated its materialistic values? Quebedeaux obviously thinks they have, and, himself an evangelical, urges evangelicals of all stripes to return to the radical core of their faith in Jesus. Whether such uncompromising faith is compatible with an emerging role as ""the respectable (even chic) religious majority"" remains problematic. In any case, Quebedeaux surveys the crisis with an eye both critical and sympathetic. His book is the best current introduction to a complex and powerful phenomenon.

Pub Date: April 4th, 1978
Publisher: Harper & Row