I GO WITH MY FAMILY TO GRANDMA'S by Riki Levinson
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I GO WITH MY FAMILY TO GRANDMA'S

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A generation has passed since Levinson and Goode's Watch the Stars Come Out; the children seen emigrating to New York have families of their own, and bring them from the five boroughs of the city to Grandma's house in Brooklyn for a family reunion. Five little cousins narrate the brief text: Millie's family arrives from Manhattan on a tandem bicycle, Bella's on a Brooklyn trolley, Carrie's in Papa's horse-drawn grocery wagon from Queens, Beatie's from the Bronx on the El, and Stella's by car and ferry from Staten Island. Goode makes the most of the opportunity to portray the variety of homes and transportation of the period--the crisply new Williamsburg Bridge (1903) sets the date. Again using soft-colored pencils and a predominance of earth tones, her elegantly organized compositions marvelously evoke turn-of-the-century New York. The reunion rivals Gammell's The Relatives Came in exuberance; the hordes of children include two sets of twins plus triplets in one family (the scene showing five of them sliding down a curved banister is a gem). The children look rather like Cabbage Patch dolls, but have cheerful individuality nonetheless; the scene where they all settle down for a family portrait makes a satisfying conclusion to a warm-hearted reminiscence.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1986
Page count: 32pp
Publisher: Dutton