AFTER THE SEVENTH DAY: The World Man Made by Ritchie Calder

AFTER THE SEVENTH DAY: The World Man Made

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Ritchie Calder is a man possessed of an astonishingly fertile imagination. On top of this, he closely follows (in professional capacity as a journalist) the day-to-day technological innovation of many complex wizard-gadgets, giving him a fund of uncommon information on which to base his conjectures. Having traveled far and wide by almost every known means of locomotion, he has drawn some vigorous conclusions about the nature of things, which he communicates in an impressive fashion. After a number of swift-paced chapters covering the archeological and anthropological development of civilization, Calder speaks practically of such things as food production and land usage, emphasizing the need to tailor separate programs to the needs of individual areas to improve themselves. Speculating on the real crisis of the population explosion, he makes it clear that intensive world-wide understanding and cooperation are the only means of coping with the problems ahead. ""Man"", he says, ""has mastered his environment by his own ingenuity...the limits (of technology)...can be extended by modern science. The frontiers are no longer physical or climatic but those of knowledge or intention."" Highly topical, and very informative.

Pub Date: July 31st, 1961
Publisher: Simon & Schuster