AGRARIAN REFORM IN LATIN AMERICA by Robert Alexander

AGRARIAN REFORM IN LATIN AMERICA

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

More of an off-the-cuff polemic in favor of land reform as a modernizing tool than an indepth study. Alexander, a Rutgers professor of economics and well-known author of a great many books on Latin America, lays to rest any fears that land reform is somehow ""subversive"" or communistic. Invoking such figures as Solon, the Shah of Iran, General MacArthur and the Second General Conference of Latin American Roman Catholic Bishops, the book rubs in the fact that ""Marxist-Leninists"" have no monopoly on opposition to feudalism. Alexander looks at Mexico, Bolivia, Venezuela and Cuba, four countries with extensive land reform, and adds a snide treatment of Cuba's economic woes along with a condemnation of the Nixon administration for a return to 1950's policies in Latin America. The book never really takes up the question of where low-interest credit for a backward peasantry will come from, much less dealing with the problem of what happens to less developed countries in a tottering world economy. Acceptable, if dull, but too lightweight.

Pub Date: April 29th, 1974
Publisher: Macmillan