ANY PLACE BUT HERE by

ANY PLACE BUT HERE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

From where we stand, Any Place but Here appears to be an effort to fill the gap in American Negro history which white America has permitted to exist. It is interested in the migratory experience of the Negro rather than his life down South, and ranges in time from trader Du Sable and Jim Beckwourth, who lived for a while as a Crow brave, to the 1965 Watts riot. It introduces a number of lesser known figures as well as known names, both representative and individual in their destinies. There was William Still, son of escaped slaves, who worked with Harriet Tubman in the underground railway; Benjamin Singleton, ""the Moses of the colored exodus""; musicians Handy, Joplin, Morton; Adah Isaacs Mencken, whose life was a classic facsimile if not example of Creole passing for white; Marcus Garvey with his back to Africa movement, Elijah Muhammad and Malcom X. The authors refer to the Negro experience in Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago, Detroit, L.A., in peace and war and Depression. Any Place but Here portrays the American Negro on the move. The book itself has an aspect of happenstance in its recollection and rather random organization, but it will serve as supplementary material in an area where there is still little available.

Publisher: Hill & Wang