THE HALLIDAY AFFAIR by Robert Elgin

THE HALLIDAY AFFAIR

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Medicine and its ethics impinge on personal integrity when Dr. Grant becomes involved in the radical surgery for cancer of the cervix that causes the death of Mrs. Halliday. Committed to his chief's beliefs, Grant as assistant surgeon supports Dr. Waters' decision and is the means of Mrs. Halliday's agreeing to the operation. Her death, in conjunction with issues bothering his wife, is the spark that leads him to question Waters' infallibility, to ""take a proper look"" at himself and the way he has been influenced, and, in the process, to learn what others think about Waters -- and himself. A young nurse is part of the re-conditioning as is an examination of Waters' records and papers, and the questions are resolved with his decision to be his own man. An English view of doctors and their responsibilities, this is less lurid than some of its counterparts here and builds persuasively from the hypocritical to the Hippocratic.

Pub Date: Oct. 23rd, 1961
Publisher: McGraw-Hill