THE BATTLE OF THE SPANISH ARMADA 1588 by Robert F. Marx
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THE BATTLE OF THE SPANISH ARMADA 1588

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KIRKUS REVIEW

As often as the English victory over the Spanish Armada has been described in juvenile books and textbooks, there has not been so thorough a description of the maneuvering during the engagements and especially what happened to the men and ships as a result of the battle. The usual approach, particularly in textbooks, has been to discuss the political and economic effects. While Mr. Marx has not omitted these, his account follows the English sailors into the cold and heedless reception accorded them by countrymen who were barely aware of the implications of their victory. It also follows the crippled ships of the Spanish back to ports where they were refused admittance until the threat of epidemic could be allayed-- often too long a time to save wounded men. Philip of Spain was gracious to officers and men in defeat while Elizabeth did not immediately grasp the scope of English success. The religious impetus to it all and the technological basis for the English triumph is very well done and the battle scenes are among the best this year. By the author of Following Columbus: The Voyage of the Nina II (1963-p.492).

Pub Date: Oct. 25th, 1965
Publisher: World