ANGLES ARE EASY AS PIE by Robert Froman

ANGLES ARE EASY AS PIE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

One way to describe an angle is to say that it is the opening between two lines that meet each other""--and, as accompanied by Barton's alligator with jaws opened wide to surround a wedge of pie, it's a reasonably helpful way. After a few warming-up exercises with pies, hills and clocks, Froman makes sense of some beginning geometry by asking readers to cut up and rearrange different figures to demonstrate how (and why) ""the three angles of a triangle always add up to half a pie--in other words, a straight line,"" the angles of a quadrangle make an angle twice that size, and those of a pentagon one three times that of a triangle. Froman makes the concepts clear at this level, but Iris learn-by-doing exercise might be more profitably applied later, say in junior high school.

Pub Date: Jan. 14th, 1976
Page count: 34pp
Publisher: T. Y. Crowell