THE EXPERIMENTS OF SEAN O'CASEY by Robert Hogan

THE EXPERIMENTS OF SEAN O'CASEY

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

An impassioned defense and eulogy of all the dramatic works of Sean O'Casey, author of Juno and the Paycock. The Plough and the Stars, etc., and a fascinating autobiography of his years in revolutionary Ireland. With the refusal of the Abbey Theatre, and specifically Yeats, to produce his play, The Silver Tassie, and O'Casey's subsequent migration to England, his undoubted dramatic genius underwent a transformation. He became- according to Hogan-more of an Expressionist and less of a classical playwright. This is a defense of his later plays in this experimental form, - Cock-a-Doodle Dandy, Within the Gates and The Bishop's Bonfire. O'Casey was disillusioned with Ireland and the wellknown Catholic Puritanism which broke out after the revolution. Hogan sees these later plays as a celebration of freedom, the life spirit and above all the comic spirit, and that, properly understood, they could and should be produced successfully. He is vehemently pro-Casey and would be the last to claim detachment in his point of view. He feels that O'Casey has been sadly neglected, but whether this panegyric will actually put the plays on the stage and bring in box office results is a moot question. An interesting, if highly prejudiced, critique of O'Casey's dramatic works, chiefly interesting to professionals in the field.

Pub Date: July 11th, 1960
Publisher: St. Martin's Press